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New Bed Installs

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by JeffNY, Jul 1, 2010.

  1. JeffNY

    JeffNY LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 257

    I have a big 'L' shaped bed, between a sidewalk and building. Its 8x46, 8x24. I have to plant about 20 shrubs in the area. Am I wasting my time cultivating the entire bed or should I just be digging the holes where im putting the shrubs?
  2. fastpine

    fastpine LawnSite Member
    Posts: 201

    Cultivating the entire space woild be a waste of time IMO..I would dig large planting holes, enrich them with compost (mix up the compost and the native soil)and plant in that...

    Any drip inplace?...Thats somethin to think about aswell..
  3. JeffNY

    JeffNY LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 257

  4. TPC Services

    TPC Services LawnSite Member
    Posts: 20

    Irrigation Drip Line, Da !!!
  5. JeffNY

    JeffNY LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 257

    oh, no. Theres no spigot near the bed, closest one is about 300' away
  6. 93Chevy

    93Chevy LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 37,805

    I always cultivate as much of my beds as possible to ensure proper soil throughout the entire bed, not just at each plant. I generally may bring in fresh topsoil, soil conditioner and/or peatmoss and till everything up. Makes for easy digging and healthy root development.
  7. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,776

    Generally I do the same. Sometimes though I run into good soil on installs and it doesn't need a tilling or amending, but that only happens 50% of the time.

    Basically you need to do a site analysis. The greatest thing about tilling is that you can easily grade out the area for proper drainage after you till.
  8. 93Chevy

    93Chevy LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 37,805

    You're right, I forgot about grading. That's another benefit to tilling.

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