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New Customers

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by LightningLawns, Jan 23, 2005.

  1. LightningLawns

    LightningLawns LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 279

    Have any of you had any luck, by going up to a persons door and just asking if they would like their lawn mowed? If so what did you say or do? thanks
  2. pjslawncare/landscap

    pjslawncare/landscap LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,410

    Are u thinkin of goin door to door or going only to the homes that look like they need it?
  3. LightningLawns

    LightningLawns LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 279

    Not sure, I think probably the ones that just need to be mowed. What do you think ?
  4. sildoc

    sildoc LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,925

    I have done that when I have extra time (ie finished the day early and wasn't ready to go home yet). I hit up people that badly needed a mowing and charged them 2-3 times my normal. Cash or check after I finish of course.
    I have sold several on yearly contracts, However I know most you do not want to do cause they are pita. They either don't have the money or just expect to much from the deliquence that they have dealt with.
  5. fairwayCuts

    fairwayCuts LawnSite Member
    Posts: 161

    I tried that a couple of times last year. It actually turned out pretty well. The one cust had just gotten behind on their mowing and had me cut their prop once, but they happened to own several rental prop and I was able to land a contract with them. Another guy I talked with had his mower go out on him. I cut it for a couple weeks asked him if he still wanted it done since his mower was now fixed, and he said yes. Guess he got tired of mowing. You never know what you might run into. If you've got an extra minute go knock on the door.
  6. tiedeman

    tiedeman LawnSite Fanatic
    from earth
    Posts: 8,745

    I went door to door of commerical accounts when I first starting out. I landed a couple of customers doing it, but a lot of times I felt it was a wasted time. BUt like I said, I did this right when I first started out
  7. DennisF

    DennisF LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Florida
    Posts: 1,381

    Use a direct mail flyer. It's more professional and usually produces better results than door hangers or knocking on doors. I used direct mail when I first started and it landed my first 15 or so customers. After that my business took off and I haven't done any kind of advertising since. I still have people calling for service and I have to turn them down since my mowing schedule is full. Once you have a customer base your business will increase by word of mouth advertising. If you provide high quality service at a competitive price the customer will find you. I can not emphasize enough how important quality work is to your business.
  8. Remsen1

    Remsen1 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,020

    I've had had very good luck with this method. I keep an eye on nicer lawns that I know are being maintained by some dude working out of the trunk of his car. Then when I notice that the lawn hasn't been cut in more than 2 weeks, I knock and ask. Most of the time they tell me that their lawn guy dropped off the face of the planet, won't return calls etc. Many times I am asked "Do you do trimming?" I answer, "Certainly!" "Good cause the last guy didn't. How much do you charge?" "I charge $X" "That's more than the last guy." "(with a wink and a smile) That's probably why he quit." "When can you start?" "Since I am here now, I can do it now."

    Within a few weeks I've got a customer for life :)
  9. PaulJ

    PaulJ LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,776

    What I have done is take my flier (a simple piece of colored paper with my logo and list of services) go to homes that look like they care about thier lawn. I will pick a street or block or area. I usually do this in the spring before the season starts. I knock on the door and if someone answers, I introduce myself and hand them the flier. I say something like " I run a lawn care company and would like you to keep me in mind for your lawn needs this season" If they don't have any quesitons I don't take up any more of thier time or mine. They can call me later. I want them to see me face to face but I don't want to come on pushy or desperate. Some people just want the info and don't want to be bothered. Soem do ask some more questions or even ask for a quote. I will then tell more about myself and my buisness and tell them I will measure their lawn and get a quote to them soon.
    I have gotten a good amount of my clients this way
    If no one is home I still leave the flier rolled up and tied to the door knob with a rubber band. I get some calls from these also but not as much interest as the ones I see face to face. Only had a few that would'nt even take the flier and only one door shut in my face.
    I'll start doing this at residential areas next month and i went to a bunch of small comercialls last month. The commercialswhere I wasn't able to talk to the person in charge will get a call or another visit soon.
  10. mastercare

    mastercare LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 289

    I think someone else mentioned this, but I typically look for the nicer lawns to cut. I think that about 2 out of 3 times if you find someone with a really nasty looking lawn, there's a reason. Usually they don't care what there lawn looks like, or they would have done it by now. If they don't have the time or energy to do it themselves, then you've got a good chance at a customer. But, I find that most lawns that are in shambles are for a lack of caring. These customers don't want to pay top dollar to care for a lawn that they don't even care about themselves. Sometimes though, you'll get lucky and find that they've been on vacation, their mower broke, etc. These are usually 1 time cuts anyways.

    Door to door works fine, but I hit everyone equally, not just the bad lawns. Bad lawns sometimes equal bad customers.

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