new employee nightmare

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by grasskeeper, Apr 30, 2003.

  1. fireball

    fireball LawnSite Member
    from ne Pa
    Posts: 172

    Well don't hire his brother who doesn't have any experience. Some people say they have experience because they watched it being done on "This Old House" Always check past employers on new hires, you will be amazed at some peoples references. A day spent checking someone out will prevent a lifetime of saying I'm sorry I didn't know.

    A food service distributor next door hired a new driver while the Transportation director was on vacation because they needed a driver real quick. The guy was a disaster. If it didn't move he would hit it. After one accident, the director was yelling at him real bad. The driver replied that nobody had yelled and screamed at him like that since he got out of prison. The director was a little startled at that and asked him what he was in prison for. The driver replied "murder". Sure enough when the director checked his application, there was the murder conviction. Nobody checked the man's history because they needed someone right now. The director quit rather than deal with the problem and sure enough two weeks later the driver is back in jail for parole violation.
     
  2. tiedeman

    tiedeman LawnSite Fanatic
    from earth
    Posts: 8,745

    I couldn't help but laughing while reading that entire story...reminds me of a time one of my employees was showing off to some girls running by and he nailed the curb and got sent a** over tea kittle on the lawn. It was the funniest thing I ever saw.
     
  3. nelbuts

    nelbuts LawnSite Bronze Member
    from SW, FL
    Posts: 1,053

    America's Funniest Home Videos:D :D :D :D :D :D
     
  4. grasskeeper

    grasskeeper LawnSite Member
    Posts: 29

    I hired a new guy the day after that, and exactly the same thing happened. No I'm just kidding, thank god this guy actually had some experience and is working out great. A lesson learned the hard way I guess.
     
  5. JR_Contracting

    JR_Contracting LawnSite Member
    from Texas
    Posts: 4

    NLMINC,
    I feel your pain. I just moved back to the town I left 3 years ago. I sold most of my lawns to some reputable LCO's and friends of mine. The problem is, they are maybe to good, because they still have all the customers I sold them 3 yrs ago. Most of my contracts were large residential, and that's where I want to be again. I have picked up a few new customers this year, but I guess I really to it for granted how important networking and people seeing you do lawns everyday really is.

    I guess it's some consolation to know someone else is starting out fresh.

    ps- my town is only 30k or so, so I am kinda limited. arrrrhhh:rolleyes:
     
  6. thfireman

    thfireman LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 541

    An LCO that was working two doors down from me once had a Toro Z that he obviously by passed the safety's on. He somehow let it get away and it ran through this guys metal storage building and a green house. The green house stopped it but the storage building was a wad of **** around the mower.

    I was in my glassed in porch when it happened and I thought an airplane had crashed.

    I think I would just give up and sell all my stuff if that happened to me. WOW! What a day in the biz!
    :cry: :cry: :cry:
     
  7. Albemarle Lawn

    Albemarle Lawn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,544

    Yes these types are out there.

    You must fire him immediatly.

    You can teach him to mow, but you cannot teach him common sense.

    You see, he doesn't comprehend the cost of the damage he caused. The expensive physical damage to the home and your equipment. Damage to your reputation.

    Potential damage: What if he cut 6" off of his foot trying to wrestle that mower sideways with one hand still on the presence-of-operator controls?

    He just doesn't get it. Never will. He should have had enough common sense to get away from that mower and ask for help instead of trying to prove himself.

    He may seem trained and everything will seem fine and then it will happen. Something ludicrous and so assinign and moronic you would shoot yourself if you had a gun just to make it all go away. He is a ticking time bomb, and you are at ground zero when he is around.

    Trust me, don't invest any more of your short life trying to train him. He will bite you in the *** when you least can afford it!!!

    KB
     
  8. JimLewis

    JimLewis LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,835

    I guess I have a differing opinion. IMO, you didn't train the guy well enough. A lot of guys will say they have experience because they want the job. And they may well have some sort of experience too - just not using your kind of machines.

    You should have really trained the guy better instead of just letting him go mow right away without any supervision. When I train a new employee, I train every single one just as if they have zero experience. I show them the basics of starting the mower, running the mower, stripes, turnarounds, etc. I demonstrate it all for them as they watch me do it. Then I let them give it a try with me walking right next to them the whole time. If they are catching on quickly, then maybe I'll go stand on the sidewalk and still watch them the whole time. We'll do this for several yards, possibly the entire day. Once I feel he's "got it" then I have the crew leader take over and watch him after I leave. We follow this same procedure on every piece of equipment.

    Because we take so much time training people the right way I don't really ever have that much problems with guys using equipment the wrong way or messing up someone's property.
     
  9. I may be the worst at training someone, but they always get the hang of the piece of equipment somewhere they can do no harm with it.
     
  10. thartz

    thartz LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 486

    Train in a wide open area.I tell them that I am going to treat them as if they have never run this kind of machine so that there are absolutely no questions as to how this machine is run.I tell them that I don't mean to treat them as though they are ignorant but I go over the smallest of routines( as far as to show which way the keys turns to start the machine even though it says on).Then I make them sign a training manual that says they understand the entire machine so if it blows up because they didn't check the oil I can show them that it was part of the training they received.I'm tired of the"nobody showed me" statement when something goes wrong.I can't accept negligence
     

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