1. Missed the live Ask the Expert event?
    Not to worry. Check out the archived thread of the Q&A with Ken Hutcheson, President of U.S. Lawns, and the LawnSite community on the Franchising Forum.

    Dismiss Notice

New Hampshire

Discussion in 'Network: North' started by KINGSBURYLANDSCAPELLC, Feb 22, 2007.

  1. 2low4NH

    2low4NH LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NH
    Posts: 1,892

    sounds good thanks guys i figured the lines "should" be much lower then 3"
     
  2. KINGSBURYLANDSCAPELLC

    KINGSBURYLANDSCAPELLC LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,851

    NEVER assume! Would u dig without calling dig safe because the buried utilities "should" be on the other side of the house and "should" be more than a foot deep?

    Also make sure u are solving the customers problem. Why are the weeds growing? What kind of weeds are they? Is it direct sun? Maybe too shady? How acidic is the soil?

    Get a soil test done. If the soil is **** then you will have no results. U may be able to aerate, overseed, and over lime. Also don't just throw lime down, at least go to Agway with a sample and they will tell u how much per square foot.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  3. 2low4NH

    2low4NH LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NH
    Posts: 1,892

    he wants the sod ripped out and new loam put down and seeded. its a sun shade mix behind his beach few pines on the edge mostly some crab grass/ broad leaf. anything special that you would recommend for seeding in the fall? i have never done a lawn in the fall. utilities come in on the other side of the house. this is more of a boat house kind of deal his house is on the other side of the street. he may also become a plow customer. this started out as a wall/beach repair. I will get the fall clean up trimming lawn install and maybe a few other odd jobs. maybe i can get him as a mowing contract too! this is his part time summer home. he lives down in mass somewhere.
     
  4. hotshot4819

    hotshot4819 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 646

    well whatever you do i would hurry up. You loosing your growing season quick. make sure you fertilize it as soon as it starts to germinate to make sure you get those roots deep in the ground. I would highly suggest hydroseeding it, (not because that what i do) but because you need help getting it to germinate as fast as possible and holding the new soil in place. Lesco has a couple great shade mixes, i have used them on some really high end stuff with great results. what beach is it on?
     
  5. KINGSBURYLANDSCAPELLC

    KINGSBURYLANDSCAPELLC LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,851

    Also make sure the fertilizer you use doesn't have a weed and feed. If you are going to use the scotts brand then make sure its the starter fertlizer. Although a real fertilizer like 19-19-19 would be ideal
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  6. 2low4NH

    2low4NH LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NH
    Posts: 1,892

    and if i cant gt it to germinate this fall? will it germinate in the spring?
     
  7. hotshot4819

    hotshot4819 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 646

    Yes, if it dont wash away with the spring thaw

    i personally dont like triple 19. we use 18-24-12.
     
  8. KINGSBURYLANDSCAPELLC

    KINGSBURYLANDSCAPELLC LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,851

    If u do it asap I see no reason it won't germinate. I seeded an irrigation job I did work on lastweek and it was coming up today
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  9. 2low4NH

    2low4NH LawnSite Bronze Member
    from NH
    Posts: 1,892

    it wont be for atleast a week i nee to move alot of material through the area first to fix some areas of a wall that were damaged by floods. the guy is against sod but it may be eaier to lay new sod down in the area. since he has sprinklers on the lawn i dont have to worry about seams dying off
     
  10. TGM

    TGM LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 931

    sod is a better route, but more expensive and probably shouldn't be mowed or walked on for the rest of the year (it takes at least 4 weeks for the roots to start growing into the subsoil).
     

Share This Page