New to drip

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by jabbo, Jun 18, 2008.

  1. jabbo

    jabbo LawnSite Member
    Posts: 215

    Installed my sprinkler system about 3 yrs ago. On a well 13 gpm-50 psi. at conn. Put a zone in for flower/shrub beds around house.1" valve w/ flow control then down to 3/4" pvc and used hunter 4" pop-ups. Like everyone else wanted to see them spray.Should have been thinking about how good they would work.Anyway want to convert over to drip and try to use the pvc that is already all around the house.I saw an emitter that screws down onto the pop-up heads that has 4 or 6 connectors for drip lines on it but don't know that much about it.Sorry so long.
     
  2. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 46,907

    You need more than that. You are looking towards at least one emitter per shrub, depending on soil conditions. There is also the consideration of durability, if you don't have enough mulch atop the drip stuff.

    And as always, you will know that the drip is not working when the plants die, as opposed to sprays you can see.

    I thought you thinking about installing a sprinkler system three years ago :)
     
  3. jabbo

    jabbo LawnSite Member
    Posts: 215

    Don't exactly know what you mean. But was more interested in pressure reducer,filter,lines emitters, and whatever else I need to do a good job. In other words what do most of ya'll use in beds around the house????
     
  4. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 46,907

    I think I left out a word, while I was concentrating elsewhere. I almost never use drip, because it lacks durability. Are you stating your shrub sprinklers never worked? Or are things overgrown, now, and coverage poor? If someone had a four-figure check for me to set up drip for their shrubs, after I tell them they don't need it, once the shrubs are established, I would be using Rainbird Xerigation products, with the possibility of having to special-order higher-flow emitters, in order to match the flow of an existing zone of sprays.
     
  5. jabbo

    jabbo LawnSite Member
    Posts: 215

    Actually some of the heads never reached some of the shrubs in the front of the beds to start with so yes all of it has over grown. What I should have done when I was laying the pipe for it was to tilt the female adapters back slightly so that the heads would spray maybe a 25 to 30 degree arc then they would have done alot better.
     
  6. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 46,907

    Overgrowth is common, but if the shrubs are established, it becomes a non-issue. An uncommon (at least these days) but effective way to feed the front of beds is from sprays or rotors in the lawn, tossing into the beds. That works around the need to add extenders to raise the shrub sprays above the growth.
     
  7. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    Talk about a bandaid approach. Convert the zone(s) to something that can water under the vegetation. Never ceases to amaze me how much money some people spend on irrigation systems that are worthless in 5-10 years because vegetation has destroyed any possible chance of full coverage.

    Are we in need of another tallest riser thread?
     
  8. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 46,907

    Shrub sorinklers in the lawn might seem bizarre, but if you were a homeowner watering shrubs from a hose, you'd be standing in the lawn, moving the hose back and forth, which sounds a lot like a rotor. Since a lot of shrub beds have foliage sloping downward from the house, you can give them effective coverage from in front of the beds. This also allows for a border of annuals in front of the shrubbery.

    That this sort of layout can function for decades without needing alteration, is another plus. That keeping heads at ground level allows for PVB backflow protection (compared to having sprays five feet above grade) is a very big plus.

    (we await the decision of the Texas judges)
     
  9. lowvolumejeff

    lowvolumejeff LawnSite Member
    Posts: 72

    Hi: You might find a retro 1800 Rainbird helpful. You can screw in on one (or more) of your existing risers. Self contains filter and pressure reducer, Easy to attach .700 drip line (Netafim is very good). You can snake that around existing landscape. Even pressure regulated and has check valves. Link to the RB retro http://www.sprinklerwarehouse.com/1800-RETRO-Retrofit-Kit-p/1800-retro.htm
    Jeff
     
  10. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    0.9 netafim at 12" dripper spacing and 12" spacing on laterals gives you a PR that is pretty damn close to RB MPR nozzles.
     

Share This Page