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Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by ha305, Feb 21, 2006.

  1. ha305

    ha305 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 68

    What would be the best way to learn to install pavers, work with someone? I would like to learn all aspects walls, patios, stairs.
  2. EgansCountryGardens

    EgansCountryGardens LawnSite Member
    Posts: 163

    Jump right in. Don't be hesitant. Try doing a small walkway for yourself, but make sure you read and follow all manufacturers specs. Tip- The most important part of your hardscape is the base prep. See if you can find any local installation seminars. I know that I went to both Belgard, and Techo-Bloc's recent yearly showcases, and even though it is not an installation seminar, they still hit on all of the main recommended installation techniques. Don't be shy to go to these. You don't have to get on your hands and knees in front of other contractors. Most of the time your sitting in a hotel conference room.
  3. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    Work with someone that knows a lot more than you and has practical experience. Classes and seminars are great, and I attend as many as possible, but hands on with a skilled craftsman will teach you a new revenue stream for your business. If you get a paver or SRW job, sub it out to someone that knows what they are doing. You can learn and then decide if you want to take on this new venue. There is a great deal of cost to obtain the correct tools to do the job safely, profitable and easily. All to often, contractors just go for it, and quality guys must fix their work at great cost to the customer. That is how our industry and hardscaping get a bad reputation. If you want to try it out your own home, good luck. If you have a spouse and you do a poor job, you will never hear the end of it, until you get good enough to fix it right or bring in someone that can. If your work in the field is not good enough for your house, why would you bother.


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