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New track skid steers

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by paul, Apr 30, 2000.

  1. paul

    paul Lawnsite Addict
    Posts: 1,625

    I was wondering if anyone has tried a new track type skid steer( Bobcat 864 or ASV). <p>----------<br>paul<br>
     
  2. EarthWorks

    EarthWorks LawnSite Member
    Posts: 135

    Does anyone have tracks on their current skid steers. Seems like the only time tracks are needed is in winter when ground is really wet here. With wheel machines you could take tracks off when not needed. I don't have tracks but plan to purchase some before this winter. While we are on the subject, which is better steel or metal? how about cost wise?
     
  3. paul

    paul Lawnsite Addict
    Posts: 1,625

    We have both metal and rubber tracks for our skid steers, problem with rubber tracks is that they can come off too easy, then it's deflate the tires and reinstall not fun! Metal tracks are ok but when you have to run on hard surfaces they can tear the heck out of curbs and ahphalt. Looking into track machine for just that reason seems that they would stay on but not tear up hard surfaces. We have rubber tracks on our mini-excavators and they seem to hold up well. Cost for metal tracks is about $2500 and rubber tracks cost $3000 for skid steers, tracks for our mini excavators are about $1000 a peice.<p>----------<br>paul<br>
     
  4. steveair

    steveair LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,073

    I have never used a tracked machine personally, but now they are a great asset in certain conditions.<p>A excavotor I know has the track system on one of his bobcats, and it works great. I've seen him drive through mud and barely sink a inch. A regular bobcat would not come close to even crossing some areas that the tracked ones can. Also, he was able to harley rake a mud area much easy. No deep tire ruts that never seem to cover up with the rake when driving across.<p>Also, they (rubbler tracks) are nice on lawns. They still can rip the hell out of it on turns, but they are softer on it than the regular wheels. (i think he says its only like 3 lbs of pressure per square inch with the tracks ---thats light) He drove across a lawn once about 40 times carrying dirt with a 1 yard bucket and when finished you could hardly tell he was there. <p>I think the tracks, like all attachments, have there good points and then there bad points.<p>steveair
     

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