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new zoysia

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by MDB270, Feb 27, 2007.

  1. MDB270

    MDB270 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 10

    I have a customer with zoysia grass and he had a car come up on his lawn and tear out a couple big patches of the grass. He wants me to repair it but I've never done much with zoysia. I'm going to put top soil down to regrade it then should I get zoysia plugs or get zoysia seed? I figure it would take way to long for the existing zoysia to creep over.
     
  2. JFF

    JFF LawnSite Member
    Posts: 248

    As far as I know, the germination rate with the seed is not very good.

    We sod it in squares or rolls down here.

    You are right, it doesn't spread very quickly.
     
  3. DiyDave

    DiyDave LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,695

    American Turf in Gambrills, Md Can get you sod or plugs Give Jane a call they are very helpful.
     
  4. AAELI

    AAELI LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 362

    You can seed but need to know what variety you have in place already in order to keep the same leaf texture throughout the lawn. Zenith and Compadre are seeded variants of zoysia that have very good germination rates. You do need to remember to plant very shallow and keep watered. In our warm climate the seeds germinate within a week to 10 days. They are slow growing, taking about 60 days until they begin to 'run'.

    Plugs or sod also do well. I have found that in established lawns the zoysia root structure will sprout new growth within a week after sodcutting and grow/fill in well within another 2 months with adequate fertilization and water.

    If sod is available you are better off going that route.

    Zoysia all the way, all the time here on Guam. $5 - $7 per square foot installed.
     
  5. lawnpro724

    lawnpro724 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,201

    You don't need to buy plugs to fix the problem, all you need to do is buy a plugger the little tool that they use to install the plugs. If you have this tool then all you need to do is go around the yard and remove plugs in different spots in the yard and transplant the to the damaged area and fertilize the yard at the correct times and the yard will fill in the bare spots and by the end of summer you won't even be able to tell where you took the plugs from and the patched area will be fixed as well. Make sure when you take the plugs from the yard you make sure to fill in the little whole with the dirt you get from the damaged area basically your just switching.
     
  6. thill

    thill LawnSite Member
    Posts: 245

    AAELI is right. You need to identify which Zoysia it is.

    Unless the area is very small, I would not consider anythng other than sod. The "fill in" or spreading rate is very slow on every type of Zoysia we have worked with.

    Good luck
     

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