Nicked Blades?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by MOturkey, Jul 18, 2007.

  1. MOturkey

    MOturkey LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,757

    I recently bought a new Gravely 260Z, and am now sharpening my own blades with a Magna-Matic 9000. Okay, since my previous mower was a 250, with no deck overlap beyond the wheels, I've managed to forget that a few times and whack some blades pretty good on rocks and gravel when turning or going over obstacles. (one thing we've got plenty of in SW MO is rocks!):hammerhead:

    Also, I think the new deck has considerably more suction than my old mower. Seems to cut better, but I also notice lots of nicks in the blades, even with just a few hours on them (usually change out about every 6-8 hours). I'm guessing that this mower is picking up smaller pieces of chat and gravel that the other mower didn't.

    Anyhow, my question is, how big a chunk out of the blade do you guys ignore when sharpening? To work them all out, obviously, is overkill, and would greatly shorten the life of the blade, but can you tell a difference in the cut if a blade has a couple of places, say 1/4 inch wide knocked in it? I've been just sharpening until the bulk of the blade has an edge and calling it good, but just wondered what the rest of you do. Thanks.
  2. drelgan

    drelgan LawnSite Member
    Posts: 71

    Could also be that your putting too sharp an edge on your blades.
  3. saw man

    saw man LawnSite Bronze Member
    from utah
    Posts: 1,021

    Good hell! Enough with all the comments about a blade being sharp! It doesnt matter if its sharp or not that has no effect on pulling rocks up!

    For me it depends on where the nick is, if it is toward the tip I will try to get most of them out, if its back a couple inches or more then I dont worry as much.

    And dont listen to the guys about leaving your blades dull, all that does is gives you a crappy cut.
  4. txgrassguy

    txgrassguy LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,083

    Mo, typically what I have my crews do in a situation like this is to reset the leading edge until 90% of the blade is uniform to the leading edge.
    One thing I have implemented to avoid damage like you mention is to change the angle of the leading edge and foil.
    Basically making the leading edge sharp but at a steeper angle so the blade is "thicker".
    This process has stopped almost all of the damage like what you are reporting and the quality of cut has not suffered at all. And like you, I mandate that after every 8 hours of operation the blades are changed out with a fresh set.
    Also blade life has increased by at least 40%.

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