No weekly use rule

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by willie1227, Jan 20, 2004.

  1. willie1227

    willie1227 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 21

    Just wondering? If you do not operate with a seasonal contract/agreement. What would be a good understanding to establish with a customer on how many days prior they think they wont need you to inform you? I was thinking of using 3 days as a rule of thumb. What is your imput? I also realize this a good reason to have an agreement in place. But Im new and not sure how all this will fly this season.

    Thanks
     
  2. sildoc

    sildoc LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,925

    It will always fly. Try to get everyone on agreements. If they are not willing to go for it the keep them up untill either you are so full you need to drop ( then tell them an agreement is needed or you will have to drop them) Or they are such a PITA that you aren't making any money anyways.
    Start the way you should so you don't have to explain later.
    I have not had a problem with anyone wanting to sign an agreement. Contract on th other hand is a forbiden word in residential and the god of all papers for commercial.
     
  3. Soupy

    Soupy LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,125

    1 day before your normal day. They might not know 3 days in advance if they won't need your service. Plus only let them do it during the drought and if they really don't need cut.
     
  4. GarPA

    GarPA LawnSite Silver Member
    from PA
    Posts: 2,585

    yes the word 'contract' can scare some people...so we play the word game and call them 'property maintenance agreements'

    we've used them from day 1. never had a problem with comm/res not wanting to sign it. Along with some other items in the agreement, it says that WE(the contractor) will determine the mowing frequency in order to maintain the property in a neat and manicured condition.
    Even in the beginning phase of a prolonged dry spell, most properties have areas that still need mowed, and almost always, the edges get shaggy even in a dry period, and need trimmed.
    If you make sure you sell the agreement as a positive thing for the customer in that it clearly spells out what we do and when we will do it, it goes over much better.
    Our rule is set in stone...no agreement, no service, no exceptions.
     
  5. DennisF

    DennisF LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Florida
    Posts: 1,381

    I avoid the word contract on residentials. I have all my customers sign a "Lawn Service Agreement" explaining what is included in the service and the weekly/monthly charge for the service . They also have the option of terminating the agreement at any time by indicating in writing that they want service halted. I give a copy of the agreement to each customer so that they feel comfortable signing. I have 95% of my accounts on signed lawn service agreements and not one customer has cancelled for dissatisfaction with service. Several customers have cancelled after selling their property and moving.
     
  6. rodfather

    rodfather LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,501

    24 hours advance notice...and there better be a damn good reason too.
     
  7. prizeprop

    prizeprop LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 820

    IN THE CASE OF SEVERE DROUGHT CUSTOMER MUST CALL THE DAY BEFORE WE USUALLY CUT AND ADVISE US NOT TO CUT.IF WE SHOW UP AND ARE TURNED AWAY THEY GET CHARGED. RARELY EVER GET CALLS THOUGH.
     
  8. dkeisala

    dkeisala LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 911

    "Contract" "Agreement", it all the same thing just comes down to the wording. I use the two terms interchangeably but sell it to customers as a tool for protection for them as well as me. My agreement (contract) with customers outlines exactly what is expected of them as well as what they can expect of me. Keeps us all honest and we know where we stand with each other.
     

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