Not again! More Kawasaki FH770D trouble

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by lotsagrass, Oct 7, 2012.

  1. CLS LLC

    CLS LLC LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 487

    Everything you said is correct.

    If compression is good, I would think it's a flywheel key.
     
  2. lotsagrass

    lotsagrass LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 610

    Ok, thanks. Maybe you already said that and I just mis-read it :) This thing is driving me nuts. Thanks everyone for the look and replies. I'm hoping it's actually a bent push rod (mildly bent) because that will be easier to fix/get to. I already have a dealer in town that has the parts available for that repair and I can do it myself. I found some other posts on here and other sites that explain how to easily make sure you're at TDC with the piston and so on. If it IS the flywheel, I think I can still do it, but it'll be a pain in the rear since I'll need to remove much more to get to it and maybe even take the engine loose.
     
  3. CLS LLC

    CLS LLC LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 487

    I really doubt it's a push rod.

    Flywheel key really isn't that bad, Removing the engine is usually as easy as removing the belts, a few wire connections and 4 bolts. Then set the engine on a bench, remove the cover, remove the fly wheel bolt and pull the flywheel off, it's not too bad.
     
  4. lotsagrass

    lotsagrass LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 610

    Do you recall if the main bolt holding on the flywheel is reverse threaded? Righty loosey instead of lefty loosey? :)
     
  5. lotsagrass

    lotsagrass LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 610

    And is there a safe way to get the flywheel off without a flywheel puller tool? I called a few places and cant find on yet...still looking. Any ideas on a SAFE way to do it without the tool?
     
  6. CLS LLC

    CLS LLC LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 487

    Yeah, sorry I didn't mention the reverse thread thing. As for pulling it off, if you can get help, put two pry bars under the fly wheel prying up (don't pry too hard) and then thread the nut on a few turns and hit the nut with a hammer, often times this will jar it loose. Otherwise you should be able to use a steering wheel puller available at most tool/auto parts stores
     
  7. lotsagrass

    lotsagrass LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 610

    Good news (but I'm confused about what was wrong with it, as I found nothing wrong)...

    The push rods were not bent. The flywheel pin was not sheared. I made a homemade puller from a piece of steel grandpa had in the barn. I drilled two holes in it for the screws that attach the outer shaft to the flywheel and I used some washers a little smaller than the crankshaft to put pressure on the flywheel. When I tightened the screws a little to put pressure on the washers that were wedged in there, all it took was one light tap from the hammer on my homemade puller over top of the shaft and it popped loose. Anyway, the pin looks great and the flywheel was where it was supposed to be.

    I went ahead and adjusted the valves since they were a little loose and it was nearly time to do that anyway.

    So after putting it all back together, it fired up and ran perfect. I don't know what was going on with it. I just pray to God I don't have to screw around with it anymore! LOL I'm tired of working on it. Oh and you're right, it wasn't as bad to get the engine off as I thought....but it was still a pain. Especially lifting the entire engine over the rear guard by myself.

    Here's the new and improved video:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHSmUxSo4bI


    [​IMG]
     
  8. piston slapper

    piston slapper LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,240

    Lotsagrass...looks like you are in touch with your inner mechanic...
    Don't concern yourself with how you fixed it....
    TRUST THE POWER
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  9. lotsagrass

    lotsagrass LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 610

    LOL My dad was a mechanic so I picked up things from him, but we're not close so I haven't been able to absorb all that he knows....but I did get some. I just worry about doing these sort of things on my own in case I need a special tool or I end up making things worse somehow. I have a good understanding of how engines work, but you know, it only takes one screw-up to really waste a lot of money. I'm still clueless about what was causing the weird problem you saw in the original video but I just hope it never comes back. The valves were sort of loose, I an say that. Now I don't hear them at all when the engine runs. Before they were ticking pretty loud. Not sure if they were way too loose and not opening the valves enough. I don't know. I'm confused :)
     
  10. piston slapper

    piston slapper LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,240

    I've been playing with this stuff for over 20 years...
    I still never run out of opportunities to make mistakes.
    If you weren't concerned about screwing it up...
    You probably would have made some bonehead mistake...
    Trust yourself...take chances only when they are the only option...
    Posted via Mobile Device
     

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