Now No Weed is Safe

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by wooley99, Nov 26, 2007.

  1. wooley99

    wooley99 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 269

    The ornamentals may not be safe either...;)

    $150, one day in class, one test and 3 weeks later and I'm legal to spray Roundup, et al. in beds. Next summer I'll still be yanking weeds from beds but hopefully I'll be yanking out dead ones.

    After I buy sprayers, signs, spill kit, log book, lock box and all the other crap required to be legal in the Sunshine State of course. If there's any cash left maybe I can get some Killsall too..:walking:
     
  2. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    Congrats, wooley!
    Are you now legal to apply PRE-EMERGENTS in beds as well, as a result of your testing success?

    pre-emergents (for example). granular form: Treflan, Snapshot, Ronstar, Lesco Pre-M 1.5%, Casoron ,etc.

    sprayable form: Gallery, Dimension, Barricade, Oryzalin (surflan)
    let me know if I can help you with ideas!
     
  3. wooley99

    wooley99 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 269

    Marcos,

    I welcome any ideas. I've got a "Limited Landscape Commercial Operator" license. Which basically means (I'll get hammered on here if I get this wrong, but here goes); I can apply "CAUTION" labeled pesticides (in this state that means insecticide, herbicide, fungicide) to plants and surfaces in beds. I can't do anything to turf areas or gardens.

    I intend to Pre-M beds and then spot treat weeds with Glyphosate or similar. And I can finally try and get rid of the scale that is causing sooty mold on some holly, gardenia and Indian Hawthorne on my properties with oils. That is if I can figure out how to evenly coat the underside of leaves without also evenly coating the outside of sunrooms. I'll also have to experiment in my yard with fluazifop before I try and go after torpedo and bermuda grass in some shrubs.

    I guess I'll be doing whatever the label says on whatever the Lesco guys, my extension agent and/or the stuff I've searched on this site recommend.

    Next year should be fun and I don't have to worry about cease and desist orders or $5,000 fines from Mike, my friendly Dept of Ag inspector.

    Thanks...
     
  4. MarcSmith

    MarcSmith LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,157

    merit granular .5 or 2.5 g for your systemic control of pests, scales, aphids, ect. works well, no sprays, no mess full year control.

    Congrats for being legit....I had my full CPO in floirda. Well worth it.
     
  5. Ric

    Ric LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,957

    Marc

    Just a side note about Merit's year long control. While it may work well for a year in many parts of the country, S.W. Florida has extremely sandy soil and a year round growing season. Therefore I have found Merit to only give 4 to 6 month control at most, under these conditions.
     
  6. MarcSmith

    MarcSmith LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,157

    I got year long control in Orlando.... and being thats he's in North west Fl, he might get some more of the GA clay working down....might get better control.

    even with 4-6 months control I still found that spreading some Merit G was much easier than dragging the hose :)
     
  7. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    Well,
    I'm a lot further north than you. But interestingly, I do see some of the same weeds down sometimes in the landscape when I vacation in FLA.
    Although some of the weeds may be out of my league, I may be able to make up for that a little in just depth of knowledge in the business.

    Let's start with Weeds:

    What's your #1 weed problem?
    What is YOUR idea of product to use for bed pre-emergent, right now?
    What are your peers using in the area?
    Do you prefer to use (or equiped to use) liquids, or granulars in the beds?

    How much mulch would you apply every spring, and would you 'turn' it occasionally?
    What kind of bed herbicide application equipment do you have, if any?
    And do you indeed have a sand base, or is it primarily clay, or other?
     
  8. wooley99

    wooley99 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 269

    Thanks for the help. All I've ever done with any chemicals up to now was my lawn. I've only been doing other properties one season. I'll answer each of your questions and hopefully learn...

    What's your #1 weed problem?
    FL has one weed for every biting bug so we have a bunch. The biggest problems I've had using only manual weed control are dollarweed and chamber bitter though. I may have better luck with the chamber bitter since learning the seeds germinate later than our other spring weeds and will need another application of Pre-M at about 70F ground temp.

    What is YOUR idea of product to use for bed pre-emergent, right now?
    I've only used Scotts Halt and Lesco 0-0-8 Pre-M. I believe both are Pendimethaline. And to date, in my yard I used the same stuff at the same times in beds and turf. I need to determine if there's something else that is better for beds only.

    What are your peers using in the area?
    Honestly I don't know. I haven't been around long enough to find too many. Those who I suspect are all legal and knowledgeable are busy when I see them and I think not likely to want to talk shop with the little jacka$$ who's in their territory. The Lesco guys (and girl) are good about what they recommend.

    Do you prefer to use (or equiped to use) liquids, or granulars in the beds?
    I don't know enough to have a preference of liquid or granular yet. I'm limited to backpack, pump sprayer by license. I prefer handhelds for both spreading and spraying but none of the properties I do except a couple condos merit wearing a backpack.

    How much mulch would you apply every spring, and would you 'turn' it occasionally?

    My full service lawns are for minimum 1" mulch in mulched, established beds. I over do most things and they get ~2". The mulch gets "fluffed" at each weeding. About 4 x year.

    What kind of bed herbicide application equipment do you have, if any?
    None.

    And do you indeed have a sand base, or is it primarily clay, or other?
    Existing properties (most of my current ones) are sand. All sand all the way down. I've bailed 50 wells around here and you don't hit pea gravel for 6-10'. The new homes are being build up on straight red clay so the beds are often a mixture of both.
     
  9. MarcSmith

    MarcSmith LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 7,157

    you can get by with treating shrubs with granular and a backpack sprayer....And not to sound redneckish here, but a hose end sprayer can bail you out of a lot of jams. You need base your applications on a more of a preventive as if you get an infestation, getting control with granular is next to impossible and the backpack isn't much better(low volume, lwo pressure, poor penetration) Usually you can get local IPM scouting reports so you can get an idea of what other folks are seeing so you can be ready.....

    regular scouting of the shrubs and being able to "spot" spray a couple shrubs when you see a few buggies make a big difference in your chemical usage. Place like TGCL don't scout, they just hose-em til they die....If you are doing regular weekly maintenace of a house, you'll see things on the shrubs....

    I woudl really recomend that you try to get some experience and get the CPO full Lic under your belt...turf spraying is easy money, and no one likes chinch bugs, moles crickets or fire ants.....Use the extension office. IFAS is like free gold....good materials, and good people. you pay taxes to employ them, make em earn their keep.


    I had two tanks a 50 in the truck and a 100 on a trailer with a boomless rig for the larger properties that i could tow behind the Lazer...keep your eyes out for PCO's going out of business, both of my tanks were used adn I got both tanks, 2 Stainless lesco spreaders 500 feet of hose for under 1000 bucks.....Evenif you can't legally use them on turf, if you find a good a deal jump on it so you will ready for the day that you can use them on turf....
     
  10. Marcos

    Marcos LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,720

    Marc,

    Sounds like you're on top of it...
    Do you think he can really get by with granular pendimethalin, like he said in his blog, or do the types of weeds he mentioned deserve something more radical?
    And how many times a year would a landscaper typically apply Pre-M 1.5% 0-0-8 in Florida?

    Up here in Buckeyeland, when we want to get serious about weed control (in granular form), we turn to Snapshot or Ronstar.
    Pendimethalin, treflan, etc. is the minor leagues, at least as far as landscapes are concerned.
    And I use Casoron G sparingly, for Canadian Thistle control, in areas FAR away from the chance of runoff into turf.
     

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