Ochard Grass

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by wilbur, Aug 27, 2003.

  1. wilbur

    wilbur LawnSite Member
    from MA
    Posts: 14

    My neighbor has an area of Ochard grass in the rear of his property. It is gradually taking over his lawn. What can he do to stop the assault? He wants to get rid of the Orchard grass and seed with his current mix. We are in Halifax, MA. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. Scraper

    Scraper LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,656

    I researched this earlier in the season. There aren't any products that I know of that will selectively control this annual grass. Supposedly, if kept cut short it will thin out over time. He might consider killing all vegetation off with a non-selective herbicide like Round-Up and starting from scratch with his mix.
     
  3. yardmonkey

    yardmonkey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 340

    Its usually not too hard to pull it, if there's not too much of it. Orchard grass is commonly found in fescue seed. I once pulled a bunch of it after Chemlawn overseeded a fescue lawn. A friend of mine had a bunch of it come up after overseeding a fescue lawn also. It stands out in the fescue due to its lighter color. You can always pull it a bit at a time, area by area. Might need to be dug, like with a little trowel or a dandelion fork. If using Roundup, could be possible to spot-spray it. Spot-spraying with vinegar might work too.
     
  4. yardmonkey

    yardmonkey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 340

    Also Orchardgrass, Dactylus glomerata, is a perennial. It spreads only by seed.
     
  5. Scraper

    Scraper LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,656

    If it spreads only by seed it is not a perennial. It is an annual, which means it dies after each season.
     
  6. wilbur

    wilbur LawnSite Member
    from MA
    Posts: 14

    I was under the impression that a plant was classified as annual or perenial based on its ability to survive the winter. Is that just flowers?
     
  7. yardmonkey

    yardmonkey LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 340

    I'm just going by the books, which all say it is a perennial.
    My references on this are 3 of my best weed books - Weeds of the West, Weeds of Southern Turfgrass and Ortho's Controlling Weeds.

    Like you say, an annual is a plant that dies each year (normally either because it can't take the cold of winter or the heat of summer). But this has no relationship to whether the plant spreads by seed or not. For instance, fescue is a perennial and it spreads only by seed. Bermuda is also a perennial and it spreads by seed and by stolons and by rhizomes. Zoysia is a perennial and it spreads by stolon and rhizome and not by seed. Crabgrass is an annual and it spreads by seed and also by stems rooting where they touch the ground.
     
  8. Team Gopher

    Team Gopher LawnSite Platinum Member
    from -
    Posts: 4,041

    [​IMG]

    Perennial Grasses (orchardgrass, bromegrass, timothy, etc.)

    "Glyphosate 4L (Roundup Ultra @ 2 to 6 pt/acre). For best results apply to actively growing plants in the boot to early head stage of growth. Adequate spring regrowth is necessary for successful control. Use the higher rates for orchardgrass, reed canarygrass, and fescues. Lower rates may require low volume technology - 3 to 10 gal/A and no tank-mixing of soil residual herbicides. A sequential application of atrazine will improve the control of most perennial grasses. Touchdown IQ and other glyphosate formulations may also be used in a similar fashion.

    Gramoxone Extra 2.5SC+ atrazine @ 1.5 to 3 pt + 1 to 2 qt. Gramoxone Extra in combination with atrazine will suppress or control certain perennial grasses such as timothy and bluegrass. This combination is not very effective on orchardgrass, bromegrass, or fescue sods. Rainfall within one or two days following application will improve the level of control. Gramoxone Max 3.0 rates would differ slightly."

    Read more about that here.
     

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