Ok guys, I need some help here...

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by Jon99, Jul 18, 2004.

  1. Jon99

    Jon99 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 375

    I am on the board of directors for our local youth football program, thanks to a great effort we have recieved a donation of 5 acres of land to build a field, another company has stepped up to do the excavating.. With volunteers we are going to seed the field, put up the score3bord, bleachers, press box etc...

    Anyway, they are looking at me for answers to get the field seeded and this is something I have never done... Whats the best method if we decide to do this yet this fall???
     
  2. youngdude

    youngdude LawnSite Member
    Posts: 152

    Hydroseading will have a better result in the long run.
     
  3. Runner

    Runner LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,494

    1st thing..... Take your budget, and figure in irrigation. It makes all the difference in the world of not only growing the grass, but maintaining it as well. While it CAN be done without irrigation, you are at so much of an advantage to have it. If you can't, timing is crucial. After all is said and done, time it out so you can seed in the fall, this way, the seed has time to establish, a season to grow (you can grow a NICE, lush, thick growth with the right fert. program), and you are ready to play on it the following fall. We have done about a half a dozen athletic fields now, and have had great success (with and without irrigation). Regardless of what you put in, I would recommend a Bluegrass - fescue mix, as the Blue grass is quick to heal and spread, and the fescue is hardy and tough. Do NOT use anything with a perennial rye in it, as it will turn your field into a giant slick in the event of wet playing. I would ALSO HIGHLY recommend a turf type tall fescue of you are not installing irrigation, as this grass is very hardy and is tolerable of the dryer conditions and drought stress, as it establishes incredibally deep root systems. Do NOT confuse this with other type tall fescues such as Kentucky 31. The downside of the turf type tall fescue is that it is a bunch type growth cultivar, as opposed to a prostate growth habit which spreads much faster. Also, it's the inevetible; if your going to maintain grass on the field, then overseeding (I suggest slit seeding) is MANDATORY for you center areas (usually anywhere from 2000 to 7000 sq. ft., depending on the amount of use per season, and the previous condition of the field). Much of this can be avoided though, with a good fert. program (meaning the CORRECT types of material applied,... not some big box store program like Scott's, or something. If you have any questions, or if I can be of any assistance, please feel free to PM me, and I will help in anyway that I can. I hope this helps!
     
  4. Jon99

    Jon99 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 375

    Thanks guy... I am guessing we will go with a conventional seeding method simply because of the cost factor.. We had talked about an irrigation system, but for only 4 game days a year, we thought it was not real practical, though we really haven't looked into the cost of a system.... Any input of the cost for a standard system???

    Any suggestions for a fertilization program for this fall once the field is seeded???? And how about a herbicide, should that be applied this fall after seeding or wait until next year???

    Thanks again guys...
     

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