OMRI vs. USDA

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by lawncuttinfoo, Feb 17, 2008.

  1. lawncuttinfoo

    lawncuttinfoo LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,010

    I would like to label my program with some sort of certification.

    So if I used only products OMRI certified would my program be able to be called USDA organic certified?

    Secondly, the crops section of OMRI is 81 pages long with just names of products, does anyone have a short list of good products from this list, meant for use on turf?
     
  2. Elden

    Elden LawnSite Member
    Posts: 137

    My understanding is that the USDA certification is used for food consumption products, and OMRI actually certifies consumer use items. There is also a NOP certification (National Organic Program) that is used for consumer use items. If I'm wrong please tell me, but this is my understanding.

    And yes, I have looked at the OMRI crop list also, and a short list to sort through would be awsome!
     
  3. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    Elden you are right

    If you grow tomatoes or peaches and sell them as organic you have to use OMRI "Allowed" products. The NOP program and OMRI are closely related, OMRI cites USDA's rules almost verbatum. OMRI certifies growers inputs as allowed or restricted, that's it. They don't write the rules they just test and post the results

    Get this (I still haven't figured this out) if you look closely at a lot of the products listed on OMRI, they are restricted, meaning they can not be used for organic production. But if you look at the packages that the same people sell, it has an OMRI stamp on it and says, "OMRI listed" it doesn't say allowed just listed. It is listed with OMRI but restricted for organic production.

    So the OMRI stamp on a product can be very misleading
     
  4. Elden

    Elden LawnSite Member
    Posts: 137

    Back in Oct. I was at a landscaping conf. in Orlando and there was a lady there that set up biological controls for green houses around the world. She said that there are alot of companies out there that are 100% organic but not listed. OMRI and NOP just take your personal leg work out of the equation to prove that they are.

    Bill, what is the deciding factor between what is allowed and retricted by OMRI. Does restriced simply mean that it can not be used on products that will be seeking USDA Organic certification, but it can still be considered organic for things such as turf, ornamentals, and trees?
     
  5. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,599

  6. Elden

    Elden LawnSite Member
    Posts: 137

    That is so funny Barry. Suzanne is actually the the lady that I was describing in my last post. Ha, It's a small world. She was a great speaker. I actually met her first at the "Meet the Pros Lunch" Organics table. She deffinatly helped me get on the right track as far as understanding the basics.
     
  7. ICT Bill

    ICT Bill LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,115

    OMRI and NOP are both for certified growers. I don't believe there are any standards or regulations for green industry uses.

    You could still use an OMRI product on a customers yard and say so. It would just mean that they could sell their grass clippings at the local wholefoods, yuck
     
  8. Prolawnservice

    Prolawnservice LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 612

    What about NOFA accredited organic lawns, go to the class if you can get up there, and then just follow the NOFA standards.
     
  9. Elden

    Elden LawnSite Member
    Posts: 137

    I've looked into the NOFA course. It was too late to go when I found out about it this year. Hopefully next year I can plan ahead for it, since it is half away across the country and over the weekend (7 total days) that's a lot of yak to spend.
     
  10. phasthound

    phasthound LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,599

    I had a feeling you were referring to her. She is a great speaker and actually practices what she preaches in the real world. She was one of our speakers at a symposium I organized for a watershed association last month.
     

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