? On Bidding Large Lawn Installation

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by BD Bone, Apr 24, 2007.

  1. BD Bone

    BD Bone LawnSite Member
    from USA
    Posts: 53

    I am bidding on a large lawn install. This property used to be a farm field and a lot of it is still rough and has not been farmed in 2 years. It is approx. 9 acres and client wants it disked, culti-packed and seeded. How do you suggest the best way to bid on this. I have never bid on property this large before and am considering a local friend/farmer to do the disc'ing and the culti-packing. The farmer/friend will need to travel @ 10 miles to the site. I will handle the seeding myself. Any input/advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. BD Bone

    BD Bone LawnSite Member
    from USA
    Posts: 53

    Is anyone Able to Help me out please?
     
  3. gobbles2700

    gobbles2700 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 71

    I would be leery of a home owner asking for a future "lawn" area to be disked. If this is going to be used as a field or pasture fine, but if it will be mowed lawn the "disking" will only be your very first step. Hopefully the farmer/friend will have the heavy drag beam to go with harrow. That will give you a fairly good rough grade. I would then use a power rake(Harley rake) to fine grade and remove the rocks. A tractor mounted one would be easiest as you could make your first pass as if you were mowing a field, then just pick a diagonal for your second pass. Seed with whatever method you want.

    As for pricing I would definitly ask your friend what he would want for his time and add a markup. My guess would be something like 3 hours tilling if there are no obstacles and an hour total for transport at around $200/hr.

    I guess really need to know what you have available for equipment and where your at? Lets us know how much rock and what type of rock your going to encounter. Tim
     
  4. BD Bone

    BD Bone LawnSite Member
    from USA
    Posts: 53

    Gobbles,
    Thanks... I should have put more info. I have a background in working w/sod farm and know a great deal about planting grass... and growing sod. I will definitely take your advice and be considering the rocks and also having to perform a nice finer finish after the rough plow/disking. Thanks for the info...It does help.
     
  5. gobbles2700

    gobbles2700 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 71

    With turf farm experience the biggest thing will be realizing you can't get that degree of "flatness" without turf equipment. Hopefully your friend will have the heavy drag bar attached to his disks and that will help establish your rough grade. Then you'll just have to treat the site as any other new lawn install.


    One qick question is what type of field was this when it was being farmed? I've heard some horror stories in my own area about cropland soil retaining enough herbicide for several years to make growing grass and other "weeds" difficult. Make sure grass is already growing on the site as a weed, other wise have soil samples taken obviously at the owners expense.
     
  6. BD Bone

    BD Bone LawnSite Member
    from USA
    Posts: 53

    Tim,
    Good point about the soil samples. You make all very valid points. I am more unsure of bidding costs more than any of these things. I am in the process of having it looked at by a friend of mine that will be handling the heavier equipment portion. This property is rural and has sat idle for 2.5 years without any crops. It was previously farm field... (corn/soybeans). However, your suggestion for soil sampling is a great one that I will most definitely do.

    Specifically, I have access to use the finish equipment for the final grade before planting. Just a little unsure of pricing the bid more than I am of of how to go about the job. The work I am confident on but it is the pricing structure for a job of this nature. I have pretty much handled smaller solo jobs that have not needed "subbed" out work prior to this and so am feeling a little out in unchartered territory and I certainly do not want to underbid this. It is a large job and will have some considerable cost involved from my end and I do not want to sell myself short and yet want to be competitive.
     

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