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oops or ok ???

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by crs, Apr 3, 2002.

  1. crs

    crs LawnSite Member
    Posts: 121

    Forcast was for 79 degrees, overcast and rain showers mid afternoon into evening. So I got out early and got some Lesco three way ester on some properties. Problem is it turned out to be sunny and 84 degrees with an 8-10 mph breeze this afternoon with a shower about 6pm.

    I have never damaged anything before doing an app but I need to know what signs to look for and how long it will be before I know I whether or not there was any damage to non target plants.
  2. vegomatic40

    vegomatic40 LawnSite Senior Member
    from 6
    Posts: 406

    What was your total volume of spray/1000? How close did you get to desirable plant material? Gotta be careful of using those esters. They will put the "WWF smackdown" on a lot of broadleaves but have a tendency to volatalize. Look for curling and deformation of leaves (especially under trees/shrubs that have tender new growth.) You will likely see any potential damage in less than a week. I usually watch the weather pretty carefully during warm weather and yank any ester I am using when it is predicted to get higher than 65 deg. Have you tried using Turflon ester? Good stuff as long as you don't use on emerging Bermuda/Zoysia and you can customize the rates much better than the pre-blended Lesco stuff. Cost / gal is pretty high but cost/ acre is very reasonable due to small amounts added to make a "kicker" mix to your phenoxy herb.
  3. tremor

    tremor LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,476

    Ester herbicides are more volatile than Amines. Probably the worst thing that happened is some herbicide "gas off" that could have curled foliage on the down wind side. The volatility at 84* probably wasn't significant enough to cause a problem. The application probably worked fine since it sounds like the herbicide was on the weeds long enough to kill them prior to the rain.
    2 questions. Was it dry enough before the rain for the herbicide to dry? And is there any "soft" herbaceous foliage nearby that could have been toasted?

  4. crs

    crs LawnSite Member
    Posts: 121

    I applied approximately one ounce of chemical per M (50 gallon sprayer, 24 oz chemical, plus surfactant, sprayed at two gallons per M). There were some plants that could have been damaged but I have not seen any signs yet. However, the weeds are on the way out. I do like the fast action of the ester formulations but I think I will move my "forcasted comfort temp" from 80 degrees down to the 65 - 70 degree range.

    Thanks for the input.

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