operating temps

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by BIGHEAVY, Jun 7, 2008.

  1. BIGHEAVY

    BIGHEAVY LawnSite Member
    Posts: 17

    hello all:)

    just wondering what your bigger mowers ( 42-60 ) run at in hot weather on big lawns. my liquid cooled mower usually is between 190-210 in moderate heat but lately when the temps are in the 90's its really up above 230 or so. temp light doesnt come on so im not overheating . i have been stopping and turn off deck and let it run a couple minutes and it goes right back down to 190. i just dont want to damage engine and hate stopping as i cut 10 acres. i have a woods kubota diesel 6215 with a 72 in deck.thanks. oh and the radiator was flushed and refilled in may
     
  2. billslawn89

    billslawn89 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,364

    i have a 52inch scag turf tiger liquid cooled, and what i did was i took out my thermostat and its running cooler, according to the gage. i don't know if you can do that with yours though, but i noticed the difference on mine!
     
  3. topsites

    topsites LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 21,653

    Not sure but hot enough to burn the crap out of ya :p
     
  4. DiyDave

    DiyDave LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,695

    Laser guided Infra red thermometer, they work much better than the gauges on most motors. Also can pinpoint hot spots, like bad bearings, exhaust blockages, etc. I think HF has them on sale for $39 or $49. Also great for spotting bad wheel bearings on trailers, I keep finding new uses. I think most air cooled motors should be kept under 250 degrees F. You can check amsoil's site to find out what temp oil starts to burn.
     
  5. F Y P M

    F Y P M LawnSite Member
    Posts: 135

    If you are cutting for an extended period it is not a good idea to take out your thermostat, the radiator cools the hot water, if it is constantly flowing it can not cool it.
     
  6. billslawn89

    billslawn89 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,364

    the water/antifreeze is still flowing thru the radiator and the air is flowing thru the radiator from the fan, when running.
     
  7. F Y P M

    F Y P M LawnSite Member
    Posts: 135

    Running your fan constantly will give you a longer period before overheating but it really needs to be two seperate systems working together (engine to heat the fluid radiator to cool it. If your not running over 220 deg. I wouldn't worry but if you do have the situation where you are working the machine hard for a long period you'll see the temp go right up.
     
  8. puppypaws

    puppypaws LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,945

    Your radiator is losing some of it's cooling surface due to a little dirt buildup in the cooling fins. Flushing will have no effect on this, it has to be manually cleaned to get the cooling fins (flu's) back to where the full surface of the radiator lets the air pass through. The cleaner the surface fins the more air goes through the radiator at a faster speed which gives it more cooling efficiency. I have been through this many, many times with combine and tractor radiators.

    To give you an idea of efficiency, I was driving my Yukon XL today and it was reading 102° degrees on the mirror. The temperature gage never changed from 190°, whether I was driving 75 mph on the interstate, sitting in heavy traffic idling or sitting parked waiting on my wife with it idling for 20 minutes. This does not only mean the radiator is clean but it has more than enough cooling surface on the radiator to keep the engine at perfect operating temperature even with the air temperature at 100°.
     
  9. BIGHEAVY

    BIGHEAVY LawnSite Member
    Posts: 17

    puppypaws
    thanks for the info. i do blow out the whole face of my radiator housing before each use and i do see all the dust and debris blow out . one thing i do notice though is that alot of these fins are pressed down all around the surface . you can feel plenty of air being pushed thru the radiator . would these be causing some trouble.
    thanks
     
  10. puppypaws

    puppypaws LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 8,945

    Yes, it will, there is a tool called a "fin comb", I own one. I have also taken a small flat screwdriver an gone over a radiator to shape the fins back to where the most air possible can travel through them.

    Some manufactures will put just enough radiator into their products to get by while saving money. When they get a little dirty or a few fins get bent closed an say maybe they lose 5% of their cooling surface, that may be enough to start seeing a little heat buildup. When I have radiator problems (meaning one just deteriorates over time) I put double flued radiators in all applications where there is no problem with fit. It is just a common sense thing, the more cooling surface you have the more trash buildup you can stand without performance of the cooling system faltering.

    You can straighten your fins so it will accept all air flow possible, blow it out good in the opposite direction of air flow. You can then spray purple cleaner on the surface (don't get on paint on machine) let it set for a few minutes, then soak it again and let it soak about 5 more minutes, then wash the radiator out good. You can use a water hose but I have used a pressure washer on big radiators, I just never use a straight stream, (more flat fan) so I am sure I don't bend any fins.

    You get your radiator good and clean and if there is no flow problems she will run cool in any temperature.
     

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