oppinion on trucks?

Discussion in '<a href=http://www.plowsite.com target=_blank ?>Sn' started by Long Island Brian, Mar 13, 2001.

  1. Long Island Brian

    Long Island Brian LawnSite Member
    Posts: 7

    Here on Long Island it has been a busy year with snow. I hope it is over but one more would be nice. I have1985 chevy c60 dump truck with a 9' meyers and a 6 yard airflow a 1985 ford f-150 with a 7 1/2 meyers and a 2 yard buyers sander a 2000 chevy 2500 series with a 7 1/2 meyers and a 1985 chevy dually with a 8 1/2 boss plow. My question is that I am going to sell the dually and replace it with a different truck. I want to get either a GMC or a Chevy I have a 4 yard sander in this truck and I am thinking either a 2500 series or a 3500 series 4 wheel drive. I want to stick with the 80's. I don't like the dually because it is hard to get started even with weight, Once it goes it goes. I think four wheel drive will be better since I generally do commercial lots. What are your guys thoughts?
    Thanks,
    Brian
     
  2. plowking35

    plowking35 LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S.E. CT
    Posts: 1,687

    Seems to me that all your trucks are serously over worked and over weight. To carry that 4 yd spreader you really need a F-550 or a 5500 series type truck. At least something in the 15000 gvw range. The HD 3500 will be borderline at best, but is better suited than a 2500 or 3500 series truck. That 2yd buyers empty will just about max the gvw of the 150. That dually is hard to start because with 4 yds of material you are at least 5-6K over weight. Be happy nothing bad has happened yet. The highest GVW in the 80's you can get is 11K. That will be be a K-30/35 cab and chassis with 4x4.
    Even that c-60 is overweight with a 6 yd speader full of material.
    If it was me, I would reconsider your truck needs, and stay with in gvw guidlines. If nothing else it may save you a large fine.
    Dino
     
  3. Long Island Brian

    Long Island Brian LawnSite Member
    Posts: 7

    Dino,
    When Plowing the dually doesn't have sand on it and the sanding that I do is local so I can get away with over weight. The only truck that is overweight is the ford, but All the trucks I have installed much beefier springs. I do appreciate the advice.
    Brian
     
  4. plowking35

    plowking35 LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S.E. CT
    Posts: 1,687

    Larger capacity springs do not raise the gvw. The gvw is governed by axel rating and brakes. It doesnt matter if all your sanding is with in 1 mile of your shop, you are still over weight. The DOT wont care one way or the other. My 1 tons are over weight with a 2 yd spreader on it, so a 4 yarder is really over weight. The only time that might be ok, is if you loaded and emptied in a single lot, say a mall or shopping center.
    One option may be to buy a newr truck for plowing, and an older c-50 or so to mount that spreader on. that way you can stay legal and safe.
    Dino
     
  5. GeoffDiamond

    GeoffDiamond LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 1,651

    I have heard, but am not 100% sure that during a storm you are allowed to run a overloaded truck.

    However I have take the GVW thing 1 step further. After this year all my spreaders will be on F 550s or big trucks. I will be removing all 4, 3 yard spreaders from F 350s. Those trucks were overloader the payload on those trucks with the spreader was around 9K lbs.

    Maintmance records will prove that the extra weight took it's toll on the trucks.

    We have replaced leaf springs, added extra springs. Have had increased brake system maintmance.

    Geoff
     
  6. diggerman

    diggerman LawnSite Senior Member
    from Iowa
    Posts: 702

    LIB,yes you are most likly over weight,so what! You know how well the trucks you have been using have held up so I guess you have to decide for your current use if what you have used will work for you in the future.We have talked here in the past about the fact that weight ratings often do not reflect the actual capabilities of a piece of equipment.For example trailers have a weight rating on them,but the rating is at 55mph and is capable of handling more at slower speeds.I have a 3/4 ton 2wd with a 2yd spreader that I load until the material is flowing over the sides it has timbrins in the back and handles the weight great and we are traveling around 4 miles to the sites.So do what is most efficent and economical for you and try and not let others spend your money.
     
  7. plowking35

    plowking35 LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S.E. CT
    Posts: 1,687

    The makers of trucks do have a saftey factor built in, like me for instance, I have a 12K gvw truck and fully laden it tops out at 14-15K. the truck does ok with that. But to take the same truck and another 4K to it, it would be totally unsafe. The reasons they make class 4-5-6 trucks is to upgrade the suspension and braking to carry and stop larger loads. No matter how much people try and argue the facts,8K in the back of a 10K gvw truck is unsafe and unwise.
    It just wasnt designed for that type of abuse, and sooner or later something will give.
    Now take that same truck and put the 2 yarder from the 150 in it, and thats a different story.
    He asked for an opinion, and I gave a sound and reasonable one.
     
  8. GeoffDiamond

    GeoffDiamond LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Maine
    Posts: 1,651

    Like I said in my post before. You put 9K on the back of a F 350 C&C, and the truck will have higher maintmance.

    We are in the middle of sanding and salting right now. My F 350 is on it's way in with 2 broken leaf springs. The truck had to run our 2 yards of sand on a lot that required salt. So see the extra money I am spending. Can you guess why the springs may have snapped, and the breaks need pads again?

    By the way the truck is a 95.

    Geoff
     
  9. diggerman

    diggerman LawnSite Senior Member
    from Iowa
    Posts: 702

    What Dino and Geoff are telling you is true and acurate,by the book if you like.I guess what I am saying as long as you are reasonable about how you use your equipment,it will most likly be serviceable for you.Yes you have may some more maintenance, you will need to weight that against the added cost of the larger vehicle and how it can be used in your operation in the off season.If you can afford the the added vehicle costs then by all means go that route,if you feel that the older trucks are more your speed, then they also will do the job, but with some added twists.
     

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