Organic compliance

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by kelmcwalk, Oct 6, 2006.

  1. kelmcwalk

    kelmcwalk LawnSite Member
    Posts: 15

    Hi all
    I was just wondering about your thoughts on OMRI and NOP.
    Thanks Kelly
     
  2. Norm Al

    Norm Al LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,227

    seems like they have a good money making deal set up.
     
  3. kelmcwalk

    kelmcwalk LawnSite Member
    Posts: 15

    Well that is the understatement of the decade lol. More to my point or question was the point as a user of products listed by OMRI or registered in complience with NOP do you feel that if it has an OMRI label or is listed by OMRI then do you feel you are safe to tell your customer that it is truely an organic product? the question arises because in all actuality OMRI doesn't run in strict complience with the NOP.
    Also do you feel that a product that has OMRI listing is a value added weapon in your organic's program? NOP lregistered product?
    I understand to be able to claim organic in areas you must have something but both, either or something else?
    Thanks all
    Kelly
     
  4. Norm Al

    Norm Al LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,227

    their stamp of aproval does not mean the product actually works.

    its a stamp of approval to make people feel warm and fuzzy and for use as a marketing tool.

    having epa exemption is proof enough for a professional that the product is truly organic.
     
  5. kelmcwalk

    kelmcwalk LawnSite Member
    Posts: 15

    "having epa exemption is proof enough for a professional that the product is truly organic."
    __________________
    When you say this please explain what you mean? What type of products are you refering to? Thanks Kelly
     
  6. Prolawnservice

    Prolawnservice LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 612

    EPA 25B Exemptions

    1) Exempted products. Products containing the following active ingredients are exempt from the requirements of FIFRA, alone or in combination with other substances listed in this paragraph, provided that all of the criteria of this section are met.

    Castor oil (U.S.P. or equivalent)
    Cedar oil
    Cinnamon and cinnamon oil
    Citric acid
    Citronella and Citronella oil
    Cloves and clove oil
    Corn gluten meal
    Corn oil
    Cottonseed oil
    Dried Blood
    Eugenol
    Garlic and garlic oil
    Geraniol
    Geranium oil
    Lauryl sulfate
    Lemongrass oil
    Linseed oil
    Malic acid
    Mint and mint oil
    Peppermint and peppermint oil
    2-Phenethyl propionate (2-phenylethyl propionate)
    Potassium sorbate
    Putrescent whole egg solids
    Rosemary and rosemary oil
    Sesame (includes ground sesame plant) and sesame oil
    Sodium chloride (common salt)
    Sodium lauryl sulfate
    Soybean oil
    Thyme and thyme oil
    White pepper
    Zinc metal strips (consisting solely of zinc metal and impurities)

    http://www.epa.gov/oppbppd1/biopesticides/regtools/25b_list.htm
     
  7. That's one organic I prefer NOT to use
     
  8. cedarcroft

    cedarcroft LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 442

    I have heard conflicting reports on the restrictions regarding garlic juice as a mosquito repellent. do you need a pesticide license to spray Garlic juice?
     
  9. Prolawnservice

    Prolawnservice LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 612

    That's debatable on both counts, garlic does effect insects, neighbors, anything within smelling range. If the wind is blowing the right way and its been damp, chances are the sketters will still be able to annoy you. I think it helps but its not a cure all end all solution. Licensing depends on your states laws.
     
  10. Prolawnservice

    Prolawnservice LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 612

    Yes, I not very fond of items that end in chloride either, but for some reason they put it on the list.:confused:
     

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