Organic guy has a question

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by lawnlubber, Mar 26, 2005.

  1. lawnlubber

    lawnlubber LawnSite Member
    Posts: 186

    Let me start by saying I don't want to start anything with you guys, you get fine results from your products and I'm not knocking that at all. I just don't want to get licensed so I don't use the products. Plus I'm in kind of a hippie place so there is a great market for the organics. I'm trying to be careful not to break the law using my organic stuff. A couple of HOAs where I do work told everyone not to use synthetic fertilizers because we have a serious problem with phosphorous in our lakes. All these homeowners approached me, their mowing guy, about starting an organic fertilizer service. I told them the best I could do was apply soil amendments. I topdressed about a dozen of these with compost and overseeded last season. That is all they got for nitrogen all season but they looked as good as any other lawn all season. I'm sure they will start to decline if they don't get something this spring, but it is too expensive and too much work to topdress every year. So I want to start using other organic products than compost. Are you guys knowledgeable about how organic products are regulated. Specifically are products like mycorhyzae or "beneficial microbes" or micronutrients considered fertilizer and the applicator needs a certification or lisence to be using them. BTW I can refer fertilizing work to someone in my area.
     
  2. NattyLawn

    NattyLawn LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,643

    I would check the "Licensing in all States" thread at the top of this forum to see what you can or can't apply. One thing I don't get is you not getting your license. It sounds like there's a need for your service in the area. Why not get your license and apply fert, etc. to customers lawns?
     
  3. Garden Panzer

    Garden Panzer Banned
    from Seattle
    Posts: 313

    www.rootsinc.com has some of the best stuff around
    I also like Milorganite as a commercial organic fert, do not apply to food crops.
    The step away from urea is a big one, but all in all, people's lawns are less important than lakes- if I had my way...there would be no lawns.
    :realmad:
     
  4. GrazerZ

    GrazerZ LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 670

    We have a distributor that sells organic ferts. Big$$. I have never used them personally. The Phosphorous issue is real. Here in Maine we use very low or no Phosphorous ferts. They are easy to get. As far as Milorgonite Iv'e been told its often loaded with heavy metals, too many folks know about that around here.
     
  5. Neal Wolbert

    Neal Wolbert LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 407

    If you check out the latest on Milorganite I think you'll find the metals thing to be a non-issue. Neal
     
  6. Garden Panzer

    Garden Panzer Banned
    from Seattle
    Posts: 313

    Neal, I agree....being a Vegan the metal thing doesn't really fit in my diet...for turf, hey- who cares! It's a good thing! Recycle.....
    On my food crop, I'm super anal.......plus we know organics doesn't include biosolids in california...lol

    :)
     
  7. turfmann

    turfmann LawnSite Platinum Member
    from PRM
    Posts: 4,536

    Would you consider seeding the lawn with clover?

    One way of getting N into the mix without fertilizing.
     
  8. YardPro

    YardPro LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,563

    almost all organic fertalizers have some amount of phosphorous. It is just released more slowly.

    gust buy a man made product that contains NO phosphorous, as someone above stated.

    There is absolutely NO difference in the elements from manmade versus "organic".

    N is N, wether it is fixed by bacteria, or in a factory, same for P and K and Mg, etc. The elements are all the same.
     
  9. lawnlubber

    lawnlubber LawnSite Member
    Posts: 186

    I was asking whether things organic people add other than are considered fertilizer by the regulators. Not about their efficacy or where or how to choose products. Simply put is the application of mycorhzae regulated in your respective areas.
     
  10. Garden Panzer

    Garden Panzer Banned
    from Seattle
    Posts: 313

    No it's not regulated here...other than one needing a bulk fert dist. license after I believe to be 100 tons....
    Nobody is going to follow around some LCO and check anyway.....people don't really care.
    The organic thing is the way to go, in several years all the pesticide things will be gone....adapting ow before being forced to adapt allows one the comfort of being ahead of the pack...good luck
     

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