Organic source of compost for organic lawn care?

Discussion in 'Organic Lawn Care' started by JDUtah, Jun 25, 2008.

  1. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    I stopped by a local city green waste plant today and asked for a copy of their soil test for their compost. I don't think it is very common out here by how they acted. They were amused by my interest.

    Anyhow, I was explaining to them the reason I was interested (organic lawn care % other applications) and they quickly replied that unfortunately their compost could not be used in 'certified' organic programs because they cannot control nor trace where the source materials came from. They said the sources must be organic certified for the compost to be organic certified... and out here there just ins't the organic infrastructure to support that.

    So for those of you currently offering organic lawn care services which include compost, do you find a local 'approved organic' compost.. or get your own composting materials from certified organic farms/dairies? No response is understood.
     
  2. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    this would fall under my "organic-based" terminology. It smudges all those lines of organic vs traditonal/non-certified organic. So far it has made life/business so much easier not having to worry about that stuff.
     
  3. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    ahhhh, I C
     
  4. wallzwallz

    wallzwallz LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 361

    Around here most compost is from the town's leaf and grass clippings. So it gets everybody's chems. There is one place an hour or so away and I'm not sure if it is organic certified or not but it's like $50 a yd before trucking.
     
  5. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    Ooo, I didn't even think about that. I thought what he was talking about was his local sewage treatment center. But that is a good point too though. But why would that be so bad? It is still the same stuff especially by the time it reaches what is in the clippings.
     
  6. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    Deep,

    I think the issue is that some "icides" that could be on clippings and green waste carry long residuals and therefore can cause the end compost to not be completely "organic". However some microbes can digest these. However,
    testing for complete decomposition of all chemicals would not be economical. The 'organic based' is a good solution for now.

    Basically what they meant was that for real and formal organics... you need enough organic interest to support a closed group. Organic farms / dairies / landscapes to create "organic" organic matter.. then compost that and redistribute to the organic sites...
     
  7. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    true, I don't see how residual "-icides" can be that bad though. I understand the being organic means organic for certain people, but... for someone like myself, do you think those residuals really have that much of an impact? This is a serious question.
     
  8. JDUtah

    JDUtah LawnSite Silver Member
    from UT
    Posts: 2,636

    I personaly don't mind. But remember I currently and regularly use 'icides'.
     
  9. jeffinsgf

    jeffinsgf LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 641

    It would seem to me that the distinction would be much more important in food crops than it would be in turf maintenance.

    I have a good relationship with the head of our city composting program. I am out of town right now, but I'll try and talk to Barbara about this issue next week.
     
  10. DeepGreenLawn

    DeepGreenLawn LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,372

    I could see how it would matter there, I forget people are using things in that aspect. I guess you would have to keep the two differentiated if you were to start messing with gardens.
     

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