Over seeding with Bermuda help

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by dmar62, Apr 9, 2014.

  1. dmar62

    dmar62 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 53

    I have a customer that wants to plant Bermuda seed over his yard. It is about half and acre and is a mix of bermuda and centipede, but mostly a mix of different grasses and some bare spots. I roundup the yard earlier this year. He wants to aerate the yard and then put seed over the yard. I think it might work but haven't did a yard like this before. With seed being $150 for a 25lb bag I don't want to waste his money on doing the yard this way if it wont work. So I need some thoughts on if there are some more options on how to get to the job done. I would use a slit seeder but nobody rents one around my area.
     
  2. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,062

    If there is bermuda mixed in the centipede, that means the centipede is either not suited to the soil, or the maintenance was not correct. Get a soil test done. You need to know nutrient levels and pH. Bermuda does not do well in acidic, poor soils. Conversely, centipede will not grow well in non acid soil that has too much phosphorus and calcium.
     
  3. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,062

    A Verticut or fixed blade dethatcher is a slit seeder without the seed hopper. Aeration is a poor method of preparing for seed. The holes are way too deep and far apart for seed to establish well.
     
  4. dmar62

    dmar62 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 53

    Most of the yard is centipede, but there are some areas that has bermuda. I was thing about using plugs, but he didn't seem to like that idea.
     
  5. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,062

    Centipede takes over if the lawn if maintenance favors it. I also know of two herbicides that will kill most other grasses save for centipede. Plugging works well only if the areas are treated like a lawn being established. Sticking grass in an area and not tending to it is very hit or miss. I recently converted a centipede lawn that was contaminated with St Augustine, zoysia grass, and a variety of grassy weeds. Centipede moved into the areas once the undesirables were damaged by herbicides.
     
  6. exmarkking

    exmarkking LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,012

    Just sod it. Bermuda seed looks and is about the size of black pepper. I would get the customer a price to sof it or tell him to find someone else. You don't want your name on sonething that has a high risk of not turning out good.
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  7. greendoctor

    greendoctor LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 9,062

    Good advice. Nothing was mentioned about water or irrigation either. Put down seed and you will be watering 3 times a day unless it is raining all the time. Bermuda seed also does not like to germinate unless daytime highs are 80 or above and nights do not drop below 70. So seeding while it is still cool and wet is not a good bet. No irrigation. I would rather sod too. After getting the soil tested and corrected according to that soil test. Centipede growing tells me the soil is acidic and kind of poor.
     
  8. exmarkking

    exmarkking LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,012

    Yelp
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  9. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 12,096

    Sod. Less risk. Less chance of call-backs and non-payment.
    Also--find out why it is bad to start with--is there a shade problem--no irrigation.
    Bermuda will not tolerate shade. (What I have heard.) LOL!
     
  10. dmar62

    dmar62 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 53

    Shade is really not an issue with this yard. I was thinking about aerating the yard, fert, and proper watering. Then see where the yard is in June or so. It should be doing better. The yard is really not that bad, just had some weeds which is sprayed, and a couple of bare spots. I was thinking about using plugs, just seed in these areas.
     

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