Overseeding in Jan?

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by wegomow, Jan 3, 2013.

  1. agrostis

    agrostis LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,261

     
  2. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,903

    Last edited: Jan 6, 2013
  3. agrostis

    agrostis LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,261

    There you go. You might get a green to green transition one year in twenty, the rest of the time, it look's like a$$, that's another big problem.
     
  4. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    Now I understand it... thanks... :)
     
  5. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,903

    I planted Scotts perennial ryegrass in plastic containers of potting soil inside the house. After grass sprouts were about 1-inch tall I moved one container to outside at 28 degrees for 24 hours. The second container was moved to a freezer at 19 degrees for 20 hours, (not cold enough), and then moved to a freezer at minus 4 degrees F. for four hours.

    48 hours later the seedlings (left) held at 28 degrees were not damaged. Sprouts held at 19 and then four hours... at minus 4 degrees F. (right) were severely damaged. (Perhaps not killed--this will be determined after a few days.)

    S3500007.jpg
     
  6. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,080

    Ground protection is something you can't get in cups... their entire root system is wrapped in frost like a popsicle, whereas the roots in the earth have opportunity to dormant as the earth feezes over time... the greenery under the snow now, will turn brown when the snow leaves in the Spring, but the roots will be protected from dehydration and alive...

    I would guess that the cups you put in the freezer had extensive root damage and dehydration...
     
  7. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,903

    I reused the left over sprouts from last week. And I tested the ryegrass in the cup that was healthy, and about 2 inches tall...by placing it in a mild freezer at 19 degrees for 24 hours. The grass was injured. Most of the time it collapsed and bent over at a point about a half inch above the soil surface. I am assuming this was the delicate area of most rapid growth. And yes, the soil froze hard. I am not sure if a more gradual onset of cold would have allowed the new grass to adapt to the cold. Clearly a sudden cold snap to 19 degrees is detrimental.

    S3500003.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2013
  8. ed2hess

    ed2hess LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 13,075

    I never had any problem getting the rye to die back in bermuda. We fertilized the perennial rye heavy and when temp got to 90F the rye would disappear. And rye does fine when subjected to freezes. It may get a little brown but hardly ever affected it.
     

Share This Page