overseeding

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by malliso, Oct 10, 2004.

  1. malliso

    malliso LawnSite Member
    Posts: 62

    I am a little new at this but was curious when overseeding do you throw a starter fertilizer down after the overseed>?right after or a week after?or never?and what is a good fert to use?
     
  2. GRASS-PLUS

    GRASS-PLUS LawnSite Member
    Posts: 14

    Some say fertilize before, some during, and some after. I always fertilize
    and seed the same time to keep from making to trips. Actually my expert
    opinion is to amend the soil before you sow the seed.
     
  3. mkroher

    mkroher LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 539

    usually starter fert is applied before seeding. This is to correct the Phosphorus levels of the soil. Phosphorus helps rooting and seed establishment.

    But you should be fine putting it down right after you seed as a 'top dressing'

    But.. You should take a soil sample though, since PH levels affect Phosphorus availability. Soils too acidic or too akeline can form insoluble P compounds.
     
  4. malliso

    malliso LawnSite Member
    Posts: 62

    thank you very much for that info mkroher.I think we are going to roundup the whole lawn first also....will that affect my ph?and what will i have to do to get redy for overseed after that?can i aerate right over the dead stuff and overseed?
     
  5. mkroher

    mkroher LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 539

    are you talking about 'overseeding' , or 'renovation'?

    If you want a brand new lawn, you don't want to aerate it. When you aerate, the holes made by the plugs are too deep, and when you seed, the seed falls in the hole. It won't germinate. Aeration is to fix compacted soil, lets air, water and nutrients to enter easier. It also helps reduce thatch, since there's more air/water flow to help decompose the dead stuff (thatch).

    You want a slit seeder (renovator). This machine is amazingly effective. You can spray the lawn with round-up (are you licensed?) And slit seed right on top of it. Round-up only kills pre-existing plants, won't kill the seed. Make sure you slit seed in two different directions. Then i would starter fert on top of that.

    Why do you want to kill the lawn?
     
  6. malliso

    malliso LawnSite Member
    Posts: 62

    Right now it has a mixture of several different grasses,crabgrass,clover,dandelions and we actually were thinking it would be better to start it over.Ther lawn has never been taken care of,it s my dads.We really are wanting to start fert apps and overseeding next year also but want to practice on his lawn,the only thing we can think of doing is starting it over.We are not licensed yet but will be before next year.The last 4 years we have spent building up to where we wanna be for next year when we go legitimate.I have so much to learn.The only thing i can think of is do his lawn completely over
     
  7. mkroher

    mkroher LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 539

    the weeds (crabgrass, clover, dandelion) can be controlled very easily. There are herbicides for the crabgrass (Acclaim, Drive) and herbicides for the clover and dandelion (broadleaf herbicide: 2,4-D). I dont' know what your temps are down there, but up here the crabgrass is dead. If you didn't control the crabgrass this year, expect it next year from the seeds overwintering.

    Other than that, the only reason to kill the lawn is if has an undesireable grass species analysis. Also, running a slit seeder (renovator) all day is very hard work, unless it's a small lawn. How big is the lawn?
     
  8. malliso

    malliso LawnSite Member
    Posts: 62

    the lawn is a quarter of an acre
     
  9. malliso

    malliso LawnSite Member
    Posts: 62

    so I could actually just overseed the lawn and do my applications starting next year to kill the crabgrass?
     
  10. mkroher

    mkroher LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 539

    sure.. but if you still have those broadleaf weeds, you should control those before you seed. It is still warm enough for the weeds to thrive and battle the new grass trying to grow. They fight for their spot on the lawn, hehe
     

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