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Photography Lessons

Discussion in 'Landscape Lighting' started by worx, Feb 4, 2009.

  1. worx

    worx LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 252

    I have just recently been able to get my pics to show up for night shots. But now they turn out grainy. How can I resolve this?

    Thanks for the help,

    IMG_0372.jpg
     
  2. TXNSLighting

    TXNSLighting LawnSite Fanatic
    from DFW, TX
    Posts: 6,462

    Buy a good camera! Ha! I have a canon something, and i set it on custom. That always does the clearest pics. nightshot sucks and is very grainy.
     
  3. The Lighting Geek

    The Lighting Geek LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 875

    You probably have the speed too high. Try ISO400 or 800. the higher the number the grainier it will be. It also means a longer exposure, so you will definitely need a good sturdy tripod and a timer or cable release to stop vibration when you shoot. Also check your quality setting, make it is the highest or best setting.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2009
  4. INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting

    INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,102

    Check your ISO settings. If it is much over 800 when you shoot night shots the photos will be grainy.

    Check your image quality settings. Make sure you are using the full image size at the highest resolution.

    Why type of camera are you using?
     
  5. The Lighting Geek

    The Lighting Geek LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 875

    too funny James. Slow on the draw there buddy? LOL
     
  6. INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting

    INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,102

    Ya, well I am on vacation Tommy... so I have an excuse!
     
  7. White Gardens

    White Gardens LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,783


    Exactly. A tripod will take care of most of it.

    At night turn your flash off, run the longest exposure at night, and don't be surprised if it takes 10 -15 seconds for the picture to take.
     
  8. worx

    worx LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 252

    Thanks for the help fella's. The camera is a Cannon Powershot S5. It's not an expensive camera but I thought it would be a great starting point to learn from. I will take some more pics tonight adjusting the ISO and picture quality. I have a tripod, not the most expensive, but a tripod none the less.
     
  9. INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting

    INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,102

    See if your camera has a timer setting... that way once you have it set on the tripod, you hit the button and there will be a 10 second (or so) delay between the time you touch the button and the moment the picture is taken. this will eliminate any camera shake from pressing the button.

    Also, see if your camera has manual settings. ( I dont think the S5 does) If so, you want to open the lens up (low apeture) and set the exposure time for 8 - 11 seconds or so. (depends on the optics of your lens but this is a good starting point)

    I regularly take 3 to 5 exposures of the exact same image using different settings. Then you can either pick the best of the group later, or get into bracketing your image in Photoshop when your processing skills develop.

    Im sure Steve Parrot (CAST) could give you better directions then I can...

    You might want to consider upgrading your camera to a Canon G10 at least. For a bit more go to the Canon Rebel which is a pretty decent Digi-SLR.

    Regards.
     
  10. worx

    worx LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 252

    Thank's James, yes the camera has a timer and I do use it. I will try this again tonight and see what happens.
     

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