Pics of Flagstone staircases

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by Silver_odd_o, Jun 17, 2003.

  1. Silver_odd_o

    Silver_odd_o LawnSite Member
    from MN
    Posts: 8

    Hey everyone, I need some ideas for flagstone steps and borders. A woman we did a job for would like a set of steps from their cabin to the lake. They have a brown/tan generic keystone wall in the front and the cabin is sided with half log and has a green roof and trim. there wil be about 3-4 seperate stair cases/steps and 2-3 flat walkway areas that we need to do somthing with. I've never worked with flagstone so I need some ideas and advice. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. JimLewis

    JimLewis LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,842

    First, I will preface by saying that - for steps - flagstone really isn't a very good choice. For walkways/pathways - sure. But not steps. Split Basalt is much sturdier and a much better choice. Anyway, that being said, sometimes people do use flagstone for steps. And here is one such picture...


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  3. JimLewis

    JimLewis LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,842

    But like I said, flagstone isn't really the best choice. Stairs should be very sturdy and have a good footing. The thin nature of flagstone doesn't really lend itself to being used as a sturdy stairway. So here is the way we usually do it - with split basalt rectangles....

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  4. JimLewis

    JimLewis LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,842

    Here is another way to do Basalt Stairs. I prefer the cleaner look of the pic. just above. But I see this a lot....

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  5. JimLewis

    JimLewis LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,842

    And yet another way to do it - but for this you'll need some heavy lifting equipment. These are some seriously heavy pieces of basalt.....



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  6. JimLewis

    JimLewis LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,842

    And finally, this is a cool picture that may help you with installation. I prefer 1/4 minus gravel to sand. But both work well. The point is to have a good solid footing. You'll want to tamp down the footing with a tamper too.

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  7. Silver_odd_o

    Silver_odd_o LawnSite Member
    from MN
    Posts: 8

    Thanks Jim, that definatly gives me some ideas, The Basalt looks like the way to go, but in the end its all up to the owner.
     
  8. vardener

    vardener LawnSite Member
    from MD 7
    Posts: 49

    Great work jim!

    My fave is the last one (not the illustration)
     

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