pine tree problems from newbie

Discussion in 'Homeowner Assistance Forum' started by papbear69, Feb 28, 2004.

  1. papbear69

    papbear69 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 3

    i am new to the lawn scene but am eager to learn. i am going to do a soil sample tommorow. but i suspect that since i live in virginia and have 50 yr old pine trees in the front yard (about 13) and i ws told by the worker at home depot that i need to lime my yard if the acid content is hard. any help please:confused: i aslo would like to know what type of grass i will need. i get approximately 4-5 hours of sunlight a day.
     
  2. Critical Care

    Critical Care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,654

    I live in within a coniferous forest area with large ponderosa pines on and around my property, but I’ve never had to put down lime. The ph in my area stays fairly neutral regardless of where you take the sample. Understandably pine needles can acidify the soil, but I tend to believe that a lot of this depends upon the soil matrix, such as clay versus sand or loam. Get a soil ph kit and take some readings under the trees and away from the trees. If it varies significantly, such as from 7.0 to 5.0, you may want to apply a bit of lime in those acidic areas. As far as what grass to go with, since it sounds like the area may be shaded, you may want to consider a shade tolerant blend suitable for your area.
     
  3. papbear69

    papbear69 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 3

    the soil ph was 7. but the nitrogen phosphorus and potasium were very low. so today i fertilized. i still need to loosen the soil and re-fertilize and seed for grass i bought the rebels new yard shade and sun mix might just have to give it a try.
     
  4. Critical Care

    Critical Care LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,654

    No matter how hard you try, nitrogen will always leach out of the soil rapidly. It's common negative ionic polarity to that of the soil makes it difficult to adhere to soil particles, like two negative polarized magnets trying to be pushed together. Since phosphorus stimulates root growth, I like to apply a fertilizer with a relatively high percentage of P to new lawns, or transplants.

    By the way... I was back in Norfolk when the Enterprise came back from Afghanistan. Stayed out at Dam Neck.
     
  5. tiedeman

    tiedeman LawnSite Fanatic
    from earth
    Posts: 8,745

    its a common misconception that pine trees cause acidic soil.
     

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