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Plant and disease ID

Discussion in 'Landscape Maintenance' started by spazfam, Jun 8, 2012.

  1. spazfam

    spazfam LawnSite Member
    Posts: 146

    Good evening,

    can anyone tell me what kind of shrub/plant this is and any idea what the white stuff is. My guess spirea and powdery mold. Any help would be great.

    mod photo 65.jpg

    mod photo 66.jpg
  2. dinozaur

    dinozaur LawnSite Member
    Posts: 5

    That shrub appears to be a "Dart's Gold" Ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius). The disease seems like it might be a giant thumb attacking the landscaping(or possibly powdery mildew).
  3. spazfam

    spazfam LawnSite Member
    Posts: 146

    sorry for the thumb i always manage at least one photo with it in there.Thanks for the confirm on the powdery mildew.
  4. easy-lift guy

    easy-lift guy LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,376

    Not sure about the type of material, however I have seen other types of material that appear the same. Has the house been pressure washed of late? Some types of material fair better or worse afterwards, I have also seen insect activity increase due to the plant material being in a weaken state.
    easy-lift guy
  5. Think Green

    Think Green LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,746

    Go on ahead and prune those ninebarks to increase air flow around and inside the plants. The moisture, humidity and rains in your area have possibly been more this month. Shaded spots with poor air circulation, wind flow will cause inner foliar spots of mildews. Prune the shrubs to encourage air flow, reduce water if irrigated and administer a slow release 12/6/6 fertilizer with micros.
    I often encounter this problem in the south with the Gold Mound Spireah as it is a rotund thick mounding plant. It is flowering now and with poor air flow, it gets mildew.
  6. Think Green

    Think Green LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,746

    Administer a teaspoon of baking soda to a gallon of water and spray the foliage of these plants if the customer doesn't want them pruned. The baking soda will kill the mildew!! Spray the upper and lower sides of the leaves. Perform this in the evening time or during the cooler times. The soda shouldn't burn the foliage but to be safe do it in the morning or the evening.
    Good luck!!

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