Planting rose bushes questions

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by tx_angler, Jan 27, 2005.

  1. tx_angler

    tx_angler LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 278

    I got a request today to plant rose bushes and have a couple of questions:

    1. We still have the possibility of freezing temperatures, will that hurt the plant? Should I talk the customer into waiting till after last freeze?
    2. About how long does it take to dig a hole and plant the bush? I'm already familiar with the concept of not burying the root-ball too shallow or deep
    3. Any suggestions for a first timer? Fertilizer? The soil is very heavy clay (almost the consistency of modeling clay)

    Thanks in advance!

    Dennis
     
  2. Guthrie&Co

    Guthrie&Co LawnSite Senior Member
    from nc
    Posts: 784

    plant in early spring/ ammend soil with bone meal/ organics/ sand

    most rose bushes require high drainage.

    i can tell you all the info you need if you can find out exactly what kind of rose bush you have.
    i.e climbing rose,memorial rose,jap. rose, rudose rose, banks rose,rose of sharon.

    better yet get a pic and send it to me.
     
  3. tx_angler

    tx_angler LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 278

    Thanks - lady called earlier tonight and I'll go by there tomorrow and get the details.
     
  4. Garth

    Garth LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 382

    First thing is to remember that the genus Rosa does not take freezing temps to well. I'd wait until the chance of frost is gone or live with the fact that the plants may die. Secondly, I'd dig the holes quite deep and amend the soil with alot of blood meal, gypsum, and soil amendment as well as a healthy dose of perlite or sand and backfill 3/4 full leaving enough room for the rootball. If it is a bareroot, soak it at least seven hours in water with a cap full of B-1 or a drop per gallon of water of Superthrive and then plant. If the plant is in a pot, water it well with a tsp per gallon of B-1 and keep about a gallon of the mix on hand after you plant it. Apply normal watering routine and once every two weeks add a little B-1 mixture. I have found that fish emulsion will work wonders in Spring but the neighbors will HATE it. I've been a member of the Rose Society for twenty three years in May. Best of luck-Garth
    P.S The rose of sharon is Hibiscus syriacus and not an actual rose.
     
  5. ProMo

    ProMo LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,468

    see if the knock out rose is available in your area they are always in bloom and resist black spot
     
  6. Guthrie&Co

    Guthrie&Co LawnSite Senior Member
    from nc
    Posts: 784

    garth said it all. thanks
     
  7. tx_angler

    tx_angler LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 278

    Thanks, guys

    I just went by the customers house and there are 12 bushes maybe 14-18" tall in small pots she said they were Tea Roses (sp?). It's an older lady and she seems knowledgable about the plants so i'm going to do a little more research but mostly let her run the show. She wasn't happy about waiting till after last freeze but I guess she'll learn to live with it or get someone else to do it.

    Thanks again,

    Dennis
     
  8. Guthrie&Co

    Guthrie&Co LawnSite Senior Member
    from nc
    Posts: 784

    well if she knew so much about the roses then she should have known the obvious about waiting until the last frost. i am looking up the roses be with you in a few mins
     
  9. Guthrie&Co

    Guthrie&Co LawnSite Senior Member
    from nc
    Posts: 784

    the tea rose is a hybrid rose.

    size -6-40 feet spread indeterminate

    form -vigorous growing canes incapapable of climbing unless trainedon supports

    flowers- may to august 1 to 3 inches in diameter

    culture sun to part shade. soil- good draiage, high fertility. moisture- medium pruning- annual to train growth and to maintain vigor of plant. pest problems- less susceptible to disease and pest than rose bush roses; use all purpose rose spray when necessary. growth rate- rapid

    notes- will bloom better in a horizontal plane

    varities of hybrid rose- blaze,golden showers,new dawn,pauls scarlet,peace,silver moon,sparrieshoop
     
  10. Garth

    Garth LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 382

    I have a suggestion that works well. After determining the variety of the rose, use groupings that will either compliment or contrast. By this I mean for instance; Angel Face is a low-growing lavender rose, Neptune is a hybrid lavender Tea rose that can do 8ft. By putting the Angel face in front you get a wall of flowers that have a subtle change in colour as the heighth increases. By contrast, using opposites colours such as orange with blue or yellow with purple. I've used Redgold roses next to Sterling roses and the contrast stops traffic. Any art shop sells colour wheels that are charts showing primary, secondary, and trimenics and can be used in planning some really show-stopping displays. Don't forget to check the height of each plant and go from low in the front to high in the back. Of course, rules are meant to be broken...-Garth
     

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