Plantscape Solutions

Discussion in 'Original Pictures Forum' started by PlantscapeSolutions, Jun 18, 2011.

  1. ToddH

    ToddH LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,184

    So you put two loads on this yard?
     
  2. PlantscapeSolutions

    PlantscapeSolutions LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,979

    I put down 1/2 yard per 1000 square feet or .162". A good variable to tell customers is they want to know is 1/8 to 3/16ths of an inch. I try to stick to just saying 1/2 yard per 1000 to keep it simple.
     
  3. ToddH

    ToddH LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,184

    Alright so you have trimmed back the app to reduce the cost and make more money.

    Not trying to be rude but I thought you were doing 1 yard per 1000 last season.
     
  4. PlantscapeSolutions

    PlantscapeSolutions LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,979

    Last year was 1/2 yard per 1K as well. This amount is pretty much the norm. If you put out too much it can actually dry out the yard and cause problems. The last yard I did last year in late April had closer to 3/16ths and it was drying out the lawn for a month. This stuff is so potent it will start to actively compost and give off heat if you put down very much.

    If your are going to do even a tiny bit more then 3/16ths you had better do it in January. I did one lawn last year where my client said his odd shaped lawn was about 30K. His lawn was closer to 17K. We put down about .324" or 5/16ths. I was worried that we might have burn issues but we did it early enough that it worked out great. The guys beaten up Bermuda lawn went nuts and he was super happy.

    Bermuda is a very nutrient hungry turf type. Tiff Bermuda has even higher needs.
     
  5. ToddH

    ToddH LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,184

    Interesting, I did not think compost would reheat after being fully cooked.

    I aerated and leveled a lawn with compost and re-seeded it with Yukon Gold in May. There was every bit of 1/4" on the lawn and more in the low spots. The grass seed came in well.
     
  6. PlantscapeSolutions

    PlantscapeSolutions LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,979

    As long as their is rich organic matter present to feed the microbes compost is never fully cooked. Mixing in sand or larger soil matter can dilute the compost to the point where it is no longer going to be able to compost quickly enough to generate heat.

    Compost will be the most volatile when you have lots of raw organic matter present. Things like leaves, Iris's, lawn clippings, and other things high in nitrogen will really generate some heat that can go as high as 180 but 140-160 is normal.
     
  7. PlantscapeSolutions

    PlantscapeSolutions LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,979

    Here is more crappy landscaping a company did at one of my clients homes in Lakeway, TX. I removed the plants you see from the ground. They were installed straight out of the pot and into the ground like you see them.

    I would dare to say that 90% of the landscaping done in central Texas and else where as well is done incorrectly. The biggest two mistakes made are little to no root prep and cheap loam soil being used that is too low in oxygen.

    Viburnum.jpg

    Viburnum Roots.jpg

    Wax Myrtle.jpg

    Wax Myrtle roots.jpg
     
  8. Hope Landscaping

    Hope Landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 277

    Wow. How long ago did they plant those?
     
  9. Hope Landscaping

    Hope Landscaping LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 277

    On your top dressing, are you marketing that service or including that into your rates, just curious how you are going about that service.
     
  10. PlantscapeSolutions

    PlantscapeSolutions LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,979

    The plants were just installed a week ago.
     

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