Poly Pipe as Eging????

Discussion in 'Landscape Architecture and Design' started by steveair, Oct 22, 2000.

  1. steveair

    steveair LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,073

    Hello,

    I ran into a old friend in the business today and he told me about what he is using for paver edging these days.


    1" or 3/4" poly irrigation piping.


    He says he just unrolls it and straightens it out for awhile while at the job, then drills 1/2 inch holes every couple of feet, and uses standard spikes, just like regular brick egdging, to fasten it in.

    At first, I said he was nuts. Now, I'm starting to think he may be on to something.

    Technically, whats the differece. They are basically the same material, and the piping will hold up to time. As for strength, I think the piping will hold just as tight as the edging will now that i think about it. Also, the piping is probably more flexible making it easier to work around those sharper radius's.

    Best of all, Price. Can get a 100 ft roll of 1" poly for around $17 retail. Thats 17 cents a foot. I've been paying anywhere from $.80-1.30 a foot for diff't types of pave edging. That is a very signifigant savings.

    I may actually have to give it a try. I have a small walkway to do for a friend in couple of weeks and figured it would be a perfect testing site as he will go for anything that saves him money.

    steveair

     
  2. UNISCAPE

    UNISCAPE LawnSite Member
    Posts: 38

    STEVE....WE HAVE BEEN USING IT ALL YEAR. AT FIRST WE PREDRILLED HOLES.... BUT THAT LASTED ONE JOB..THEN THE DRILL WENT DEAD. NOW WE JUST USE BRUTE STRENGTH. WE FOUND THAT 1" WORKS BETTER THAN 3/4". HOPE THIS HELPS.
    AND I AM SAVING BIG BUCKS$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
     
  3. FIREMAN

    FIREMAN LawnSite Senior Member
    from n.j.
    Posts: 318

    DO YOU GUYS MEAN BLACK IRRIGATION PIPE? WOULD NEVER HAVE THOUGHT OF THAT..
     
  4. Stonehenge

    Stonehenge LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 1,277

    I guess a couple things I would worry about with that is that there is only about a millimeter of pipe actually touching the pavers. Also, won't that tend to deform when installed and afterward? I changed to an aluminum edge restraint this year, partly because of the heat deformity of the plastics.

    Abd while this may be a minor point, it involves appearances and customer perception - I'd worry that the customer would think that you're putting in an inferior product to save a few bucks, or worse, that you don't know the right way to restrain brick.
     

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