pond system filter?

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by work4green, May 16, 2004.

  1. work4green

    work4green LawnSite Member
    Posts: 91

    Hey folks,

    I just installed my first solo system on a large residential job- it actually began with a renovation of an existing system that was mostly destroyed while renovating the house. I've installed a new pump, along with a filter. The previous system had no filter and the few heads I could get to work would barely shoot 10-15' so I thought they were clogged with silt- hence my reasoning for the new filter. Fast forward a while... I have the system working this past week, and have run it through a few cycles, with no problems. I showed up today to meet with my client, sign off on everything, and get paid. Well, fortunately the client didnt make it, and while I was waiting, I tested the system, and it barely would pump any water. The filter was clogged almost completely with algae. The filter is a 2" tee type on a 2" main. Based on what little info I've given you, can you point me in the direction of what to try next for filtration.

    I'll try to post back some more details on the system later this evening, but have an emergency to take care of right now.
    Thanks,
    Andy
     
  2. work4green

    work4green LawnSite Member
    Posts: 91

    ok, sorry about that folks, here is some more info on the system:
    -the pump is a 2hp berkely, with a 2" main that splits after about 100' to 2 mains- 1-2" and 1-1.5". The system runs 88 RB5004 heads on 16 1" DV valves and a 1.5" pga valve that runs a set of heads on the opposit side of the driveway. Theres quite a few shrub sprays that I installed earlier in the year with the old pump. The total is around 90 sprays. This is a fairly big yard. What I'm getting at here is that I need a really BIG filter that can handle the volume of water I need to move, and is also low maintenance so it doesnt need to be replaced or cleaned constantly.

    Also, is there any type of buoy that is designed to lift the suction line high enough to keep from pulling in the mucky lake bottom trash? I realize that if the line is too high, I can have problems with floating debris or air being sucked in as well. The lake is about 3 acres, and is fairly clean of weed growth. Here in GA, it seems most lakes have a problem with silt and clay being suspended in the water for some time after a hard rain.

    Ok, so you've made it this far through my post. If you can think of anything that might help my particular situation, please let me know. If you've ever had to fight debris in a lake pump situation of any size before, weigh in as well, Thanks.
    Andy
     
  3. Fatheroftwo

    Fatheroftwo LawnSite Member
    Posts: 19

    Try putting the suction pipe through a cement block along the run in the pond to keep it off the bottom. What type of strainer are you using on the end of the suction line.
     
  4. work4green

    work4green LawnSite Member
    Posts: 91

    Good question...

    I dont know- thats the only part of the system I left original- the foot valve, suction line, and pump solenoid. I'll try to get out there with wader boots later today and see if I can get anything to improve- and see if there is any sort of strainer.

    Andy
     
  5. Fatheroftwo

    Fatheroftwo LawnSite Member
    Posts: 19

    In the past I've cut the end off the screen and wrapped the end with wire mesh and secured it with copper wire on the end of the pipe. If that doesn't work, may want to use a smaller screen(pipe) like maybe a #12.
     
  6. Burger

    Burger LawnSite Member
    from Montana
    Posts: 192

    Submersible pump?
    I have a 1.5 pony electric pump sitting in a creek.
    I ran some one inch pipe right off a tee at the pressure side of the pump back down to the suction foot and plugged it. I drilled three 1/8" holes in the plug to spray a jet of water across the Screen to help keep it free of debri. otherwise no filters other than the screens in the heads.
    oh, and do you have a check valve in the system? don't want crud to get sucked in the heads and ran back to the pump thanks to natures siphon.
     
  7. work4green

    work4green LawnSite Member
    Posts: 91

    no check valve downstream of the pump.. just the foot valve that keeps everything from draining back into the lake. I like the idea about the self cleaning screen you have.

    Andy
     
  8. MikeK

    MikeK LawnSite Member
    Posts: 145

    Hello Andy,
    Try the Alge queen Filter. I think JD landscapes stocks it.
    It is a filter that will do up to 80 GPM, and you fill it with pea gravel. Put it on a couple of concrete blocks out in the water. We Use it in just about every lake application we install and have it in some really dirty water. Works pretty good. Also, you may want to take a look at the Irritrol Cr 500 heads. They have the largest inlet screen surface area of any head I've seen and work very nice in a lake application
     
  9. work4green

    work4green LawnSite Member
    Posts: 91

    Thanks for the help guys, I have a solution. John Deere had a well suction screen made of 4" pipe with tiny slits in it. I do like the algae queen filter though... maybe for next time around. I'll show pics of the filter when I get a chance.

    Andy
     
  10. DGI

    DGI LawnSite Member
    from SE Mich
    Posts: 173

    A Bigfoot 80 gallon guzzler with fine pea stone set far enough off of the bottom should work fine as long as the water isn't being disturbed too much otherwise. You might want to put it out to where it is deep, like 4 feet, so you can get it off of the bottom and the top, providing a large buffer zone.
     

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