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Pool patio pitch question

Discussion in 'Hardscaping' started by alldayrj, Jan 27, 2013.

  1. alldayrj

    alldayrj LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,747

    My dad is positive we can get the water off with a compound pitch, i just want to make sure its natural to walk on and not a stumbling hazard
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  2. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,403

    google NDS duraslope


    And DO NOT retort to using the 1-inch wide pool drain. you know, the white channel with the narrow plastic slots. That stuff over the years fills with sediment. And I know that as a fact.



    .
     
  3. alldayrj

    alldayrj LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,747

    the NDS stuff is about 80? per 4' IIRC
    found this article basically stating everything above
    http://www.riverpoolsandspas.com/blog/bid/75121/Deck-Patio-Drainage-For-Inground-Swimming-Pools-101
    I dont like the idea of the drain by the house, I would like to put it right after the coping but we agreed to dowel the pool slab into the concrete pool. If we keep the existing steel pool(homeowner is debating doing a new concrete pool) this is what I will do. other wise I guess it is spot drains. does anyone have a link to a nice square drain? I hate round ones
     
  4. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,403

    I would not go drilling in the pools side walls, header, whatever you wanna call it. To me - they're walls.

    We work around multiple pools annually. And I have never seen a single concrete pool (gunite and concrete are the same thing in my eyes for what we do) where a slab has been doweled into the concrete. In my eyes - do not go drilling into their pool. Some here may reply "we do it all the time". Good for you. The slab must float with the winter heaving. If you down that slab and it heaves I it could apply pressure to the dowel points and cause a structural crack. I've seen it all, structural cracks, earth quake damage, poor mixes of cement, I can go on and on.

    Also the pool builder may frown on their pool being drilled in. You'd be amazed how many lawsuits arise from concrete problems with concrete/gunite pools. Primarily because pool builders take short cuts in the gunite aspect. The use gunite with super low PSI strength. the don't use enough rebar. And so forth.

    Duraslope is the ONLY drain system that you DO NOT need to pitch. That's the beauty of it. Yeah it's pricey. But it works and you'll never have to do a thing with it afterwards.
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    Last edited: Jan 28, 2013
  5. SVA_Concrete

    SVA_Concrete LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 467

    I second the no doweling motion.

    You are actually suppose to put two layers of building felt between the pool wall and the pool deck. To allow movent.

    Duraslope is nifty stuff!
    On drains channel drains, I usually go with a slope of 1/16 inch to 1/8inch per foot.
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  6. alldayrj

    alldayrj LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,747

    Yea I've been reading 1/4 per foot and think thats heavy. Plumbing uses 1/8 to carry turds in a pipe.

    I omitted doweling from the proposal and will explain it when we meet for a deposit hopefully this week.

    Duraslope is cool but its so commercial. If i do a drain to do 2 or 3 square metal ones or the thin plastic strip
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  7. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,403

    As I stated earlier in this thread - the "thin plastic strip" will be a not so wise choice. We rip them up at about 3 different houses a month. They are always compacted with sediment. And they are not paver friendly - 1/2 of their composition is rounded, thus requiring mucho sawing of the bottoms of pavers.

    Just not a good product.

    The pool builders use the "thin plastic strip" because it's cheap. Just like the tract home builders install those ugly brass $17 light fixtures in the hallway.
     
  8. alldayrj

    alldayrj LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,747

    So brass drains it is. I still can't find a place locally for square ones if anyone has a link to a supplier they use
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  9. DVS Hardscaper

    DVS Hardscaper LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,403

    The brass drains will probably be ok. One thing to ALWAYS keep in mind with drains is - you should ALWAYS install drain system that will virtually never compact with sediment. And if does fill with sediment - it should be EASY to clean. See, people don't even change their furnace filters, so they're certainly not going to mess with cleaning their drains.

    The picture is of poor quality, but here is a link to a picture of the Duraslope.
    http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=288845&page=4


    It's the LAST picture. Like I said - poor quality.
     
  10. alldayrj

    alldayrj LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,747

    I'll look tomorrow on my laptop, thanks man.
    Also, a brass drain that is part of a basin with a removable grate for cleaning would be ideal
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