1. Missed the live Ask the Expert event?
    Not to worry. Check out the archived thread of the Q&A with Ken Hutcheson, President of U.S. Lawns, and the LawnSite community on the Franchising Forum.

    Dismiss Notice

Possible diagnosis? pics

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by TriCityLawnCareLLC, Jul 29, 2010.

  1. TriCityLawnCareLLC

    TriCityLawnCareLLC LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 1,024

    I renovated this small section of turf for a couple. There was an existing stump that had ground up, so i cleanup the the grounded stump, added 5 yards of good topsoil, seeded, fertilized. They watered at least twice daily. As you can see in the pictures the new grass came in very well. I drove by the property tonight and realized it is turning brown. It's been fairly dry hear in Ohio, we had about 1/4 of rain in the last week and a half. This is the only section of grass that's brown. Now the interesting part is that about a 1'x1' section of the new grass in on the neighbors property, and it seems to be doing ok, but the neighbors don't take that great of care of their lawn (mow it too short, weeds starting to pop through). The property owner mows at a very reasonable height. Why is it turning brown? sorry no pics of the brown grass. It doesn't appear to be dead, but very very dry, but the rest of the yard is green.

    107_0157.jpg

    107_0159.jpg

    107_0181.jpg
     
  2. grass4gas

    grass4gas LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 473

    You posted pics of the before, during and after...why did you not post a pic or two of what it is you're talking about?:confused:

    Can't offer any help without some pics...
     
  3. TriCityLawnCareLLC

    TriCityLawnCareLLC LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Ohio
    Posts: 1,024

  4. grass4gas

    grass4gas LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 473

    Then why are you asking for help in diaognosing the issue if "WE" don't have pictures to look at so we can help you?

    We are not magicians...
     
  5. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    When the new grass is still olive green, let it grow as long as possible, between cuts, during summer. Especially in the sunny areas.
     
  6. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,256

    lol

    Let's see if this helps

    Drought stress

    Dog urine

    hydrophobic soil

    grubs

    sod webworm

    chinch bugs

    pythium

    dollar spot

    NRS

    red thread

    brown patch

    snow mold

    flying spaghetti monster

    Sure I missed more than a few, but these were just off the top of my head.

    (Last 2 were for grins and giggles)
     
  7. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,256

    I'm trying to understand this.

    How would one not let it grow as long as possible between cuts?

    Cut it once a month and it would be really long.

    Cut it every day and it wouldn't be.

    Besides, if you cut it more frequently, you are 'forcing' the growth to occur at the root level, which is what you want. You ever let sod get real long and then try to cut it? Or do you cut it ASAP without sucking it up?
     
  8. fl-landscapes

    fl-landscapes LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,542

    just a guess as others have said without pics. BUT if the newly seeded area is the only area browning out....it could be the newly seeded area doesnt have as deep a root system yet as the established part of the lawn and is suffering heat and drought stress sooner than the rest of the yard because of its more shallow root system????? just a thought
     
  9. Kiril

    Kiril LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 18,298

    How about not cutting until it is needed?

    Please expand on this.
     
  10. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,256

    Expand on what?

    You already know everything there is to know about everything, we're soooooo very fortunate to have you gracing us with your presence.

    You forgot to add the sheep picture.
     

Share This Page