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Possibly the strangest question ever...?

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by crazycritterguy, Jun 11, 2006.

  1. crazycritterguy

    crazycritterguy LawnSite Member
    Posts: 31

    Ok guys, I mow my 12 1/2 acres with a scag TT...love the mower....but.....I'm also getting into raising bees...hives/honey...the whole deal. When I mow at normal speed, any bee on the grass/clover gets chewed up and shot out the discharge at warp 7. If I go SLOW....I can sometimes get the front "blade air push?"...thing....to blow them off the flower before I hit them and turn them into tiny pieces of bee sushi. SO...is there a special...."bee screen/mower setup/adjustment/anything at all I can do,,,etc"....that will let me mow at basically normal speed without killing everything in my path? Mowing slow is not an option.....any ideas?...anybody have to deal with something like this before?
  2. tylermckee

    tylermckee LawnSite Member
    from wa
    Posts: 248

    sounds like you need some PVC pipe w/ holes drilled in it, a few different pipe fittings, a backpack blower, and a lot of duct tape! now get to work, and dont forget the pics.
  3. olderthandirt

    olderthandirt LawnSite Platinum Member
    from here
    Posts: 4,900

    Why do you want a lawn filled with clover? I would move the hives to a differnt location and then eliminate the clover and concentrate on keeping it out. The cloer will soon over take the grass and then you will be mowing a weed field.
  4. Absolute Weed C

    Absolute Weed C LawnSite Member
    Posts: 51

    I was a beekeeper for many years,,, Bees reproduce fast enough to supply the hive. If you keep the workers population up the queen will start producing nothing but drones. Which any good beekeeper knows its time to change the queen out. Mow them there is plenty more where they come from. Your honey production will not fall because you are mowing once a week and killing a few bees. If that was the case after a week of mowing in the outer areas from other lawn companies you would be out of bees. Highly unlikely. Your bees dont just stay on your property for nectar and pollen. They have a large range to travel.

    Just food for thought
  5. Grassmechanic

    Grassmechanic LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,697

    Put a light on your mower and mow at dusk.
  6. crawdad

    crawdad LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,939

    Clover makes some good honey.
  7. Too funny! Man just too funny!

    Especially "don't forget the pics"

  8. lilchunk2

    lilchunk2 LawnSite Member
    Posts: 8

    I had a problem with mowing frogs on a property there were hundreds of them after a week of slowing down for a couple i ended up just not looking down and thinking theres no frogs.
  9. jameson

    jameson LawnSite Fanatic
    from PNW
    Posts: 7,077

    No, no, it seems the only strange question on LS is the one not asked...:waving:
  10. Pro-Scapes

    Pro-Scapes LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,181

    lol thats a good one... "there is no frogs" sounds like a line from a movie.

    I hit a turtle the other week in some 6 inch grass near a pond. CA THUNK poor lil fella didnt stand a chance against 200mph blades.

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