Post Dethatching, Now to Seeding

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by NittanyLawncare, May 4, 2007.

  1. NittanyLawncare

    NittanyLawncare LawnSite Member
    Posts: 83

    I just dethatched the front yard of the property with a power rake, and now need to seed, but am unsure of how to get the best results. I was thinking of using a fine fescue or kentucky blue and would like to know which type would best be suited for the lawn or what would be recommended (Its in central PA). After that, how should I go about laying it? The ground is already rough from dethatching, just lay the seed, water and lay hay? Or is there a better way to get it nice and thick. Here are some shots of what I'll be adding to.

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  2. DoetschOutdoor

    DoetschOutdoor LawnSite Bronze Member
    from S. IL
    Posts: 1,818

    Spreading seed and then simply putting hay over it will only give you weeds and waste your money. The yard looks to be pretty thin from the pics so I would rent a powerseeder, do 2 or 3 different passes on the yard, put down the starter fertlizer and water. Or you could aerate/overseed but I'd powerseed. Always gotten good results from dethatching and then powerseeding.
     
  3. NittanyLawncare

    NittanyLawncare LawnSite Member
    Posts: 83

    Thanks! I'll get to it tomorrow and see how it turns out.
     
  4. MOW ED

    MOW ED LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,028

    Seed to SOIL contact is what grows green grass as long as there is moisture to germination.
    Throwing seeds makes birds happy and you not so happy. As stated a power seeder is an option or if you are up for some old fashioned "work" get a load of topsoil and shovel it in and rake the seed in. It has to stay watered for a few weeks but not drowned. Straw will keep moisture in. A little 10-10-10 starter also does it good.
    I give instructions but no guarantees with seeding. Make sure the mix is appropriate for your area and use a good quality blend with little noxious seed. It is rewarding to see it grow and even more rewarding to put the green in your pocket.
     

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