Power cord on transformer

Discussion in 'Landscape Lighting' started by pete scalia, Dec 19, 2007.

  1. pete scalia

    pete scalia LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 960

    Does a 12 gauge power cord result in less voltage drop than an 18 gauge power cord on a transformer?
     
  2. Eden Lights

    Eden Lights LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 805

    We would need more information to answer your question, but you can use the voltage drop formulas you already know to answer your question.
     
  3. pete scalia

    pete scalia LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 960

    please explain? I'm talking about the power cord plug. Not LV cable.
     
  4. Eden Lights

    Eden Lights LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 805

    Voltage drop formulas are the same, just plug in the numbers and you will have your answer or post all the information and we can help you out. ( length, amps, volts, and etc.)
     
  5. pete scalia

    pete scalia LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 960

    What in God's name are you talking about? Am I in the Twilight Zone?
     
  6. Eden Lights

    Eden Lights LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 805

    Is this a joke or what? If you have a 6ft power cord with a 5 amp load at 126 volts you run the numbers for various wire sizes just like you do on the LV side. The formulas are the same.
     
  7. pete scalia

    pete scalia LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 960

    I will re format the question


    If I place a load on the transformer and have an 18 gauge power cord attached and take voltage readings at my homeruns and record them

    If I then replace the 18 gauge 6 ft cord with a 12 gauge one will the voltages be higher at the homeruns. All other things the same.

    This is all I ask or should I just test this for myself to find out. Does anyone else care? There are transformers with 12 gauge and Transformers with 18 gauge cords. Why is this?

    Is there voltage drop from the power cord gauge or does it matter since it's negligible?

    Grazie.
     
  8. Eden Lights

    Eden Lights LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 805

    Ok, now tell us the primary amp load and I can run the numbers on a six foot cord.
     
  9. pete scalia

    pete scalia LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 960

    well let's just say it's a 1200VA transformer and for the heck of it has a 9 amp primary load.
     
  10. Chris J

    Chris J LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,837

    The transformer is going to reduce the primary input by a power of 10. If you have 120v coming in, your 12v lug should read 12v. If you reduce the size of the primary cord, the end result is going to be so minimal that it is not going to matter. For instance, let's just say that by reducing the cord size your incoming voltage dropped to 119v. Your out put at the 12v lug would then be 11.9v (who cares).
     

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