Pre-M for garden?

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by walker-talker, Apr 14, 2002.

  1. walker-talker

    walker-talker LawnSite Platinum Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 4,771

    I just planted my tomato and pepper plants in my garden. Is it possible to put down a pre-m without harming my plants? If so, what do you recommend?

    MATT
     
  2. groundsguy1970

    groundsguy1970 Banned
    Posts: 166

    Why would you want to eat chemicaly treated food???:confused:
    Those plants will pick up some of that garbage and send it on up the food chain....
     
  3. walker-talker

    walker-talker LawnSite Platinum Member
    from Midwest
    Posts: 4,771

    I see your point, but I didn't think it would be that bad in small quanities. With lawn care during the summer months, I just don't have the time to control the weeds the old fashion way. Looking for simpler way of doing things and open for suggestions. I usually put down cut grass for a mulch bed. This helps for awile, until the weeds poke through.

    MATT
     
  4. lawnstudent

    lawnstudent LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 472

    How bout a little family safe bark mulch?

    jim
     
  5. KirbysLawn

    KirbysLawn Millenium Member
    Posts: 3,486

  6. tremor

    tremor LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,476

    Pre-M is not labled for veg garden use. There is a version that is used extensively in commercial ag. Prowl is Pre-M labled for ag use. Preen or Treflan isn't labled either. Nor is Snapshot, but I used it in my garden last year & will again this year.
    Dinitroanaline herbicides do not translocate in plants or we'd all be eating them at every meal. They can impede the rooting behavior of young transplants though, & for that reason, I limit their use to the unplanted rows & keep the hills in good till thereby unrooting weeds via cultivation. Some crops don't favor the use of all mulches. Check with your local ag-station for ideas on mulches for crops you will be planting in your area.

    Steve
     
  7. KirbysLawn

    KirbysLawn Millenium Member
    Posts: 3,486

    Steve, Preen isin't labeled for veg garden? You have a look at the above link?
     
  8. dougaustreim

    dougaustreim LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 488

    I find that the use of the the term pre-m to refer to preemergents in general causes some confusion. Pre-m is a trade name for pendemethilin. When dealing with pesticides, it is probably best to stick to using proper terminology, to avoid confusion. In addition to Preen, which is treflan, there are some older preemergents that can be used in the garden, such as Dacthal etc.

    Often times the same active ingredient is used with several different labels. Even though a crop isn't listed on the label of a turf package, the same ingredietn may be found in a garden package with a different label.

    With all the legalities involved and all the different formulations and differing state regulations, I think we should be very hesitant to make reccomendations concerning the various uses of products. We can suggest names of products that might work, but the user should refer to the label before making any application decisions.

    In my state at least in order to make a reccomednation for an application in this state you must be licensed in this state.

    Doug Austreim
    Austreim Landscaping Inc
     
  9. tremor

    tremor LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,476

    Kirby,
    Good eye. My mistake. Preen is labeled for veggies. I think I saw "preen" as "pre-m" the first time I read the thread. For the sake of accuracy, Preen & Treflan are same active ingredient (trifluralin), but Treflan is a 5%G & Preen is something like 1.47%G.

    Pre-M (pendimethalin) is what I was referring to. Prowl (pendimethalin) is the Ag version of the same molecule. I guess it's because Pre-M is so accepted, very easy to say, & infers what the anticipated effect will be, that it's name has become rather over used. The fact that I sell box cars of the stuff might have clouded my vision too.

    Pre-M http://www.bluebooktor.com/Library/..\docs\label\L30030.PDF

    Prowl http://www.cdms.net/ldat/ld867035.pdf

    Pendulum http://www.cdms.net/ldat/ld3HA001.pdf

    All exactly the same formulation of the same molecule, coming off the same production line in the same plant. Even the bottles are the same. Only the labels are different.

    The fact that I do things on my own parcel of earth doesn't imply an endorsement or a recommendation unless someone reads something into my statement. The label is the law when commercial treatment occurs. My jugement is the law on my own property.

    Doug brings up an interesting & frightening point.

    I am licensed to make recommendations in 4 states & that is where I am when my mouth runs in real time. It'll be funny to see how the liberal state of NY views this forum with respect to recommendations regarding pesticide treatments to land in New York. Is it legal for me to respond to a question from a New Yorker but not someone form New Jersey? LESCO news was banned from circulation in NY for years because every issue didn't come with a full text specimen label for every product mentioned in the articles. I suppose the day will come when Chuck will have to respond to a court order, issued on a complaint, based on someones having gathered information in this forum. Then a liberal lawyer & judge will team up to gain the identity of an individual who made a statement that was then.........Anyone of us could someday be held liable for our words that are now in print. How scarey is the future sometimes?

    Steve
     
  10. dougaustreim

    dougaustreim LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 488

    There is actually a formulation of generic treflan under the American label that is the same 1.47% as Preen. This label is for garden and ornamental use. Can be found at many independent garden centers that sell Fertilome and HiYield Products.

    Will not be found in the chains, however.

    This is usually sold at less than half the price of Preen. The granule sizes are not as uniform, however, so it is a little more difficult to apply consistently

    Doug Austreim
    Austreim Landscaping
     

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