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problems with fescue drying out

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by hue-nut, Jul 9, 2006.

  1. hue-nut

    hue-nut LawnSite Member
    Posts: 39

    Here is my problem, I've got a large lawn that I am looking after. We totally renovated the lawn, power raked, aerated, overseeded, topdressed, fertilized, ect. It greened up really nice which worked out great because my client wanted the yard looking nice for a party. they had a big party, with vollyball, bociball, and overall alot of wear on the turf in 90 degree weather. Now that lawn is in terrible shape with major turf damage. The weird thing is that the brown dead grass is all fescue, the rye is totally fine. Anyways I need to get this lawn ship shape as soon as possible and I was wondering what your experience would tell you in this situation? It is too late to overseed, fertilizing is the only thing that I can think of doing right now. It was fertilized one month ago with the overseeding and such being done a month and a half ago with a starter fert. any advice would be much appreciated.
  2. muddstopper

    muddstopper LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,342

    Lets see. Appox a 6 or 7 weeks ago you totaly renovated a lawn, powerraked, fertilized and seeded, topdressed etc. Then the owners held a party and trampled all that new fragil grass. And now your severally stressed turf is dieing off. If its only 6 or 7 weeks old, it certainly hasnt developed a good root system, most likely, whats dead wont come back. My suggestion is to wait about another 6 or 7 weeks and then renovate again. Depending on the temperatures, some of the fescue seed might not of even germinated yet and the grass could get thicker on its own, and maybe not. At anyrate, if you can wait a few more weeks, it will give the chance for any ungerminated seed to germinate as well as allow you to re-plant during more favorable conditions.

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