Prunning Question

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by dcondon, Feb 21, 2006.

  1. dcondon

    dcondon LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,246

    we have a client that wants his crabapple tree trimmed now, mid Feb. When is the best time to do this???? Thanks for the info.:waving:
     
  2. kickin sum grass

    kickin sum grass LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 628

    you can do it now but you will cut off the blooms. I would wait until it blooms and then trim as needed
     
  3. dcondon

    dcondon LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,246


    Thats what I was thinking, I thought it would be better after it had bloomed. I haven't really looked at the tree so i don't know just what he wants.
     
  4. Az Gardener

    Az Gardener LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,899

    You need to trim it now. You will sacrifice some blooms but if you wait until the bloom is complete the sap will be running and you will be more likely to have incidence of pests and potential disease. Blooms will occur on 2nd year growth and they will be bigger if there are fewer of them. Trim dead, diseased and crossing branches first then go for older growth. Don't trim more than 20%. Don't be a sissy prune the tree now. I am IAS certified.
     
  5. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    Az is right on the money. After all it is a crabapple. Ask if it loses it's leaves in the summer or is subject to any of the other maladies that affect most crabapples. They do have a great flower display and if reasonably healthy should put out good fruit for fall and winter. At this time of year you can see the canopy and make good pruning cuts to clean up the tree and create a pleasing shape. Use a good, sharp and clean pair of loppers or pruners and make sure you disinfect them when you are finished with this tree before moving on to any other plants.

    Kirk
     
  6. Green-Pro

    Green-Pro LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,420

    Most fruit bearing trees are better served by pruning while dormant, mid-February is a great time to do this. Two weeks ago I completely topped an apple tree, while topping is a tad extreme, this is what the customer desired to lessen the amount of fruit. My own trees (apple, peach, mulberry, flowering crabapple, and cherry) I selectively prune branches every other year. Directing the energy used for the tree to grow branches, to the production of the fruit itself, will result in a higher quality fruit.
     
  7. Dreams To Designs

    Dreams To Designs LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,406

    Green pro, if it is a good client, bloom or bud pruning would be more effective, but much more costly. It's great to have the flower display, then limiting fruit production. You are absolutely right about bigger and better fruit when there is less to be had. If you get any extras, Id love to try some of that Iowa fruit.

    Kirk
     
  8. Green-Pro

    Green-Pro LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,420

    Kirk

    Client is a "no frills" type, we mow and trim the property but thats pretty much it with the exception of these trees.

    We got hit by a late frost last spring, really knocked production down in the local orchards. Our trees didn't produce apples or mulberries, but the peaches and cherries did o.k.

    Give me a shipping address and we'll see what we can arrange, lots of peaches and I'm the only one that loves them. Five peach trees the smaller white ones, very sweet though and great in a cobbler or pie mmmmmmm :clapping:
     

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