Putting Sheaves Back On, Need a Little Help

Discussion in 'Mechanic and Repair' started by Speed350, Aug 3, 2005.

  1. Speed350

    Speed350 LawnSite Member
    from Fl
    Posts: 2

    Had a quick question... I purchased a Lazer CT a few months ago that only had abouy 40 hrs on it. Today I was mowing with it and it just stopped dead and I heard a pop. Looked under it and there was a broken spring laying on the ground. After moving it, both of the pump sheaves were laying on the ground also. Come to find out that whoever put the mower together when it was purchased didn't tighten the pinion screws and the damn things were just hanging there. Kinda amazed it lasted this long. I know it wasn't the former owner because he always had the mower shop where he purchased it do all the work. Now that my story is out of the way, I wanted to know how far do the sheaves go up on the pump shafts? The owner of the parts shop I go to told me to put it all the way up the shaft till it stops. I don't know if this is correct because when I put it all back together that way, it doesn't look like the sheaves line up with the tensioner pulley. It looks like there is a down angle from the sheaves to the tensioner. Can they just be set further down on the shaft until it lines up with the tensioner? Or is it fine where it is?


    Thanks for any help,
    Speed350
     
  2. Restrorob

    Restrorob LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,022

    I would align the pump pulleys with the tensioner pulley, If you don't you may have a belt wear issue from running crooked thats if it even stayed on.
     
  3. Speed350

    Speed350 LawnSite Member
    from Fl
    Posts: 2

    Hey thanks for the reply. That was what I figured. When I got it together the way he said it didn't look right to me, but just wanted to make sure.


    Thanks again!
     
  4. greywynd

    greywynd LawnSite Member
    Posts: 132

    Try to find something straight to line them up with, 'eyeballing' can be deceptive sometimes. Maybe a carpenter's square, or a long straight edge, even a piece of flat steel or square tubing or something might work.
     

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