PVC Type

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by caden2000, May 14, 2008.

  1. caden2000

    caden2000 LawnSite Member
    from 74745
    Posts: 10

    Hey guys I've got a question. Going to install a sprinkler system in my own yard and was wondering why some people use schedule 40 for their lateral lines and some use sch 125 or 200. Which should i use? I live in SE OKlahoma so pretty mild climate.
     
  2. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 22,070

    I've been using sch 40 all my career, I find it durable because of it's thicker walls, easier
    to work with; you can use PVC cutters instead of saws, saving the hassle of cleaning
    saw shavings out of everything. The only drawback: a little more expensive, and,
    because of the smaller I.D., friction loss is more and should be looked at in designing.
    That being said, it's bullet proof. With the class sizes, care must be taken back filling,
    with sch, throw it in.
     
  3. caden2000

    caden2000 LawnSite Member
    from 74745
    Posts: 10

    Thanks for the input. I thought that I should use sch 40 and now you've confirmed it for me. Thanks again.
     
  4. irrig8r

    irrig8r LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,535

    A bad load of CL 200 years ago (lengthwise hairline cracks at the ends) made me aware of how it was easy to damage during handling. Further proof over the years by way of running into it with shovels...

    CL 125 is for DIYs who cut corners and end up passing the problem on to the next owner...

    So, I always use SCH 40 in both new installations and repairs. IMHO, the increased friction loss/ diminished flow capacity is far outweighed by the durability.
     
  5. BrandonV

    BrandonV LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,260

    we were doing a simple tree install monday, digging by hand mind you. one of the guys hit a pr200 irrigation line, remember its a shovel, and it shattered, we had to replace ~15 feet of pipe. you can come back 20 years after a sch 40 system has been installed and bang on the pipes still, its worth the investment if you're going to be living there. Now if you're "flipping" the house or don't plan on living there long term it might not be worth the extra $
     

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