pythium or dollar spot?

Discussion in 'Pesticide & Herbicide Application' started by grassmasterswilson, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. grassmasterswilson

    grassmasterswilson LawnSite Platinum Member
    from nc
    Posts: 4,512

    So we had a nice 3 week stretch of drought and 100 degree days. Then we had a week in the 90s and about 5-6 inches or rain for the week. Now we are back into dry and 90s.

    Shortly after the rain I noticed what I think is diesease on mostly my hybrid bermuda. I just assume that because of all the rain that the leaf blade stayed wet. Is this dollar spot?

    bermudadisease7.15.12.a.JPG

    bermudadisease7.15.12.JPG
     
  2. Think Green

    Think Green LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,746

    Wilson,
    Take some dead stems and some stems from the surrounding areas and separate them. Look at them under a magnifying glass for spots and lesions.
    A state or university test is the best way to detect these diseases, as I am seeing this start to infiltrate our bermuda's also. It is so bad that I am afraid that the recovery process and the time involved is against us. Not enough time left in the summer to fill in the spots.
    I wish this response was more informative. I am needing to know also, but I don't have the spare time to send all these specimens off to state and wait for a diagnosis. By the time I get the results back, the use of fungicides will only cease the spread temporarily and not allow time for regrowth.
     
  3. Brett Thomas

    Brett Thomas LawnSite Member
    Posts: 83

    Pythium blight always works from the crown of the plant and works outward towards the leaf tip
     
  4. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,172

    If you could possibly photograph a section very close up using good sunlight with plants against a pure white background (paper laid in a good angle to catch the sun), there are several very good guys that can recognize the many fungi that we deal with. Some of only see brown patch and TARR, but other have far more vast experience. Close up with large leaf patterns, roots, crown are all important. Look for frog eyes or brown patches with a different color in the center. Post these and let the more experienced guys help. Could save a lawn and I totally agree that the universities are too slow to return a positive finding on the fungus.
     
  5. coolluv

    coolluv LawnSite Gold Member
    from Atlanta
    Posts: 3,563

    Drought Stress.

    Dave...
     
  6. cgaengineer

    cgaengineer LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 15,782

    I agree.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  7. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,904

    Drought would affect all the grass--not kill some and leave the rest. Perhaps there are two kinds of grass--one susceptible to whatever is the cause. And one not susceptible. Is this all the same grass? Hybrid Bermuda?
    No rye? No poa? No fescue? No common Bermuda?
    The odd pattern of damage means something. I don't know what.
     
  8. georgialawn88

    georgialawn88 LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,075

    i have spots in my yard like that. about 3 or 4 spots not near as big. they showed up literally over night. The grass is completely dead about 8 inched by 12 inches. Ive never sen that before. It looks identical. but i have a irrigation system so it shouldn't be due to stress. i dunno... but whatever that yard has mine looks close just not as bad.
     
  9. cgaengineer

    cgaengineer LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 15,782

    It will leave spots just like this in Bermuda...I know it for a fact. Had one lawn that looked just like that...added water and it is now fine.
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  10. RAlmaroad

    RAlmaroad LawnSite Silver Member
    from SC
    Posts: 2,172

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