Q for PAR users

Discussion in 'Landscape Lighting' started by Mike M, Dec 17, 2007.

  1. Mike M

    Mike M LawnSite Bronze Member
    from usa
    Posts: 1,941

    When using PAR's in wells, what are some tricks people are using for installations? Is it better to use a lense cover to keep debris out, or is it better to use the shield side to avoid glare? I'm thinking I should experiment with debris covers, and improving protection of contacts.

    Just wondering about tricks and preferences when using wells by people who have figured out how to use them with success. Also, wondering if silicone from a caulking gun or a hardening sealant would provide better protection than grease on the contacts.

    Thanks,

    Mike M
     
  2. Chris J

    Chris J LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,829

    You should get someone like Joey to manufacture a well light with both a glare shield and a lens. It's probably already in stock! If not, I'll be expecting commission checks for my invention.
     
  3. pete scalia

    pete scalia LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 960

    there are two schools of thought. If it's open on the bottom (ie: standard 5" black PVC issued sleeve)use a grate or "open" shielded device as not to accumulate condensation on the underside of the glass lens.

    If it's fully sealed then use a glass lens and or grate cover together
     
  4. Mike M

    Mike M LawnSite Bronze Member
    from usa
    Posts: 1,941

    Thanks, that makes sense about the condensation. Chris, Unique has a debris grate that fits over the slanted side. I'd like to try some of those.

    Also, for the flat side, they have a grate that looks like it works as a louver to reduce glare.
     
  5. Mark B

    Mark B LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,019

    Well I prefer the well lights on walls, trees, etc. I do not use anything to cover the light. I wonder even with a cover will the mulch still catch on fire? Seems to me that heat would still build up.

    On that note. I do tell my customers DO NOT cover the fixture with mulch or line needles, or it will catch on fire. I have had 2 service calls to where the mulch has caught on fire, due to who installed the mulch.
     
  6. INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting

    INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,102

    When installing a well light or any other inground fixture I would advise you to connect a thermal breaker to the lead wires and place it under or directly beside the fixture. This will cut the power to the fixture if it rises above the threshold temperature of the breaker.

    Nightscaping offers these as a stand alone part upon request. Catalog number is LO-78-40-TB.

    Have a great day.
     
  7. Chris J

    Chris J LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,829

    You tell your customers that the fixtures may catch fire? And you still install them anyway? WOW!!!!!!! :hammerhead:
     
  8. Lite4

    Lite4 LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,109

    I use them a lot on walls and uplighting large trees. I like the spread of the light a little better than the MRs in certain applications, just my opinion. I have had wells full of leaves and have not caught on fire yet, however I do recognise this as a true danger. I give my customers a choice for a debris guard on the wells if they are willing to pay the extra. If not I advise them to just check them from time to time to ensure they are cleaned out.
     
  9. INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting

    INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,102

    Tim, try those thermal breakers I spoke of a few posts up the thread. They will help you sleep soundly at night. For a couple of bucks each they are cheap insurance.

    Have a great day.
     
  10. pete scalia

    pete scalia LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 960

    Me too Tim, I find the PAR halogen flood is wider and softer and more diffuse than the widest available MR. I find the PAR lasts longer too.
     

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