question about mulching

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by KingMoneyNYC, Apr 29, 2008.

  1. KingMoneyNYC

    KingMoneyNYC LawnSite Member
    Posts: 63

    One of the workers at my local equipment shop told me that mulching the grass, will not look as good as bagging it. He said the mulched grass will turn brown and will be visible...this doesn't sound right to me, what do you guys think?
     
  2. lawnprosteveo

    lawnprosteveo LawnSite Bronze Member
    from Tulsa
    Posts: 1,930

    Mulching wet, fast growing tall fescue doesnt look good. I went back to side discharging it. I have to go over it a couple of times in places, but it looks good. I dont bag, and mulching only works for me late in the season.
     
  3. MIDDLESEX LANDSCAPE CO.

    MIDDLESEX LANDSCAPE CO. LawnSite Member
    Posts: 54

    ON thick ,green, high end homes mulching is not an option, youd be fired in 2 passes.
     
  4. mngrassguy

    mngrassguy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,167

    Depends on the grass type. We ALWAYS mulch/side discharge KB here. Bagging tends to increase thatch. We bag spring/fall clean-ups only
     
  5. whoopassonthebluegrass

    whoopassonthebluegrass LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,214

    What? I think you're confused...
     
  6. mngrassguy

    mngrassguy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,167

    Nope. Not according to U of Mich studies...
     
  7. whoopassonthebluegrass

    whoopassonthebluegrass LawnSite Platinum Member
    Posts: 4,214

    Got a reference for that?
     
  8. mngrassguy

    mngrassguy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,167

    Contrary to popular belief, returning clippings to the lawn does not normally contribute to increased thatch formation. Thatch is a layer of undecomposed organic matter that builds up between the soil surface and the actively growing green vegetation. A thatch layer will develop if organic matter is produced faster than it is decomposed by microorganisms. The major factors contributing to thatch development are vigorous grass varieties, excessive nitrogen fertilization, infrequent mowing, and low soil oxygen levels. Small clippings are composed primarily of easily degradable compounds which break down rapidly and do not accumulate. Long clippings may contain wiry stem material that is slow to decompose.
     
  9. mngrassguy

    mngrassguy LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,167

    Sorry, no. We were told this at a recert seminar given by a U of Mich professor. I thought it was just common knolledge.
     
  10. kmitt

    kmitt LawnSite Member
    Posts: 27

    I mulch exclusively. What I find works the best is to cut thick wet lawns in 2 passes perpendicular to each other. The first pass is cut 1/2 inch higher than the second. Any clumps left over I just disperse with a blower. The result leaves no yellow spots from drying grass and I have no thatch problems after doing this for 10+ years. For me this is also faster than hauling full grass bags to the truck and having to dump a truck full of grass somewhere. The only exception is not to do it around pools as clippings tend to stick to people's feet and end up in the water.
     

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