Question for seeding

Discussion in 'Turf Renovation' started by jay12, Dec 15, 2011.

  1. jay12

    jay12 LawnSite Senior Member
    from KY
    Posts: 270

    I had to fix some damaged places in a lawn yesterday due to septic line replacement. I used a fescue blend with 8 percent rye. Im not sure what the soil temp is but weve had 3 days this week at 60 degrees and several days with 50s as well. Should the grass we sewed be safe to come up, or will I need to go back and put more seed down later. Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,777

    Jay,
    I think it is just a guess. I think nothing happens below 45 degrees soil temperature. I am doing some experiments by planting seed in November, December, January, February and March. I think you will have time in spring to plant grass again when the soil temp hits about 50--probably when air temp hits about 60.

    Indoors I have some grass seed started on December 8th. We keep our house at 68. So far at 7 days, Scotts "High Traffic"(30 percent rye) is up with the tallest sprouts about 1 inch tall. Scotts "Heat Tolerant Blue" (mainly fescue) first sprouts appeared today--about a quarter inch tall.

    Last year, when I planted seed on top of snow, first sprouts appeared on April 15.

    Of course, you could have 'pre-germinated' the seed by soaking it in warm water for 72 hours, but you only gain about 24 hours advantage.
     
  3. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    It would be interestting to know, that if seed germinates this close to winter; Will it survive to start growing in the Spring...

    My problem here is; that if we get a dry fall, such as we've had the past 2 years, there seems to be plenty of death even with seed that germinated at the beginning of October and some even earlier...

    The irrigation is generally shut off by October 1st...

    I would say, keep an eye on it and overseed in the Spring if there are thin areas or no survival at all... be sure to hold off on the pre-m in this case... :)
     
  4. jay12

    jay12 LawnSite Senior Member
    from KY
    Posts: 270

    I will let you guys know how it turns out
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  5. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,777

    The score so far: I sowed Scotts "Classic" (30 % rye) in small pots outside in Michigan. Seed sown October 29 is a maximum of 1.5 inches tall at 48 days later. It looks Ok in spite of 2 inches of snow which later melted.
    Seed sown November 7 is about .25 inches tall at the maximum. (38 days later). Temp today is 33. so get your seed in at least 38 days before snow.
     
  6. RigglePLC

    RigglePLC LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 11,777

    More photos. Here is loose bare soil "honeycombed" due to a hard frost about December 5th, in Michigan. Second photo is same time but in a slightly protected location. Seed may germinate in spring--or maybe not. We will see.
    Seed is Scotts "Classic". I also sowed some Scotts "Heat Tolerant Blue" (mainly tall fescue) for comparison.

    honeycomb..jpg

    ClassDec.jpg
     
  7. Smallaxe

    Smallaxe LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 10,081

    If you get more freezing and thawing, you may get to watch the seed plant itself... Rain usually just moves the seed into the openings currently there from the Honeycomb effect... :)
     

Share This Page