rain water vs sprinkler system

Discussion in 'Lawn Mowing' started by 1MajorTom, Jun 21, 2007.

  1. 1MajorTom

    1MajorTom Senior Moderator
    Posts: 6,074

    Have you ever noticed any difference between rain water and a sprinkler system as far as rain water being better for the grass? Pretty dumb question huh? Well I was just wondering if anyone has noticed that when a lawn gets a good dose of rain water compared to a good dose of water from the sprinklers, the rain water always seems to bring back the grass to life much better than the sprinklers. Ever notice that?
     
  2. MJS

    MJS LawnSite Bronze Member
    Posts: 1,316


    Yup. I dunno why, though. I think it maybe has to do with the conditions outside on a rainy day, as opposed to the conditions when the sprinklers go off. For example: when it rains, the sky is cloudy, the wind blows, and it generally gets cooler and stays cooler for a little while. The sprinklers can go off when its 110 outside, and the sun is beating down. Big difference.
     
  3. satireirony

    satireirony LawnSite Member
    Posts: 13

    Yes, I've noticed it, too.

    I sure hope someone smarter than me can explain why!

    =gregg=
     
  4. MeadowsLawnCare

    MeadowsLawnCare LawnSite Member
    Posts: 192

    Pretty sure rain water has nutrients in it whereas tap water is filtered. My grandpa has a garden and he uses a well to water as apposed to tap water and it grows healthier and faster. You also don't have the additives in rain water.
     
  5. martinfan06

    martinfan06 LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 631

    Ill go with that answer sounds like that could defiantly be it, good points.
     
  6. txgrassguy

    txgrassguy LawnSite Gold Member
    Posts: 3,083

    Oh, come on now - the outside conditions of rain vs scheduled irrigation times?
    You guys need to understand chemistry a wee bit better.
    In a nutshell, the primary difference between rain water and either non or potable water has to do with the chemical composition of the non or potable water, the type structure and valiance at the turf site and current cultural practices in effect at time of the rain or ancillary watering.
    Water other than rain has a completely different chemical composition in terms of both macro and micro nutrients, solids, bacterial content, total dissolved solid content and salt content - too name just a few of the differences. All of these factors combine in the ancillary water process to impose marked differences at the turf site as compared with rain.
    Yes, I know in certain parts of the country pollution will adversely affect rain water yet as a whole, rain water is much more neutral than ancillary water.
     
  7. mdlwn1

    mdlwn1 LawnSite Silver Member
    Posts: 2,443

    rain water has nitrogen in it....it might have something else as well
     
  8. mkroher

    mkroher LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 539

    I would think that it's more volume, and it penetrates the surface better. Sprinklers just mist about, and probably evaporates easily. A good rain can "soak" the lawn.

    When you water the lawn, you want the bottom of the roots to get wet. Most irrigation systems go off a few times a week for a few minutes. Not long enough for the roots to get wet.

    People with irrigations should water DEEP once a week, rather than those short intervals 2-3 times a week. Multiple light waterings also promote fungi.

    Just my 2 cents.
     
  9. mkroher

    mkroher LawnSite Senior Member
    Posts: 539

    nitrogen, zinc, iron...

    but it also brings those unwanted metals like sulfur, sodium, and chlorine
     
  10. bohiaa

    bohiaa LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,220

    HAy guys, Out here in the Country, we have septics...

    well a few years back, they introduced a system that will take some of the USED septic water and release it to a sprinkler head......

    it's one that you can move around..... YOu talk about GREAT way to water your lawn.....

    Just dont drink it, and you NEVER see childern playing in it....
     

Share This Page