Rainbird 1804 vs. 1806 debate

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by Squirter, Aug 7, 2007.

  1. Squirter

    Squirter LawnSite Member
    from Zone 5
    Posts: 172

    As I read through the various threads and learn from you Pro's, it seems there's been a bit of debate about the use of Rainbird 1804 vs 1806's. One guy says......use 1806's while others say 1804's. I live in Central Indiana and my lawn is Kentucky Bluegrass/Perennial Rya. To better protect from weeds and the summer drought, I tend to keep the grass quite tall...especially in the summer.

    Well, I'm finally going to break down and have an irrigation system installed. The questions are.....should I use 1806's or 1804's with MP Rotator's. I intend to go entirely MP R's using SAM-PRS bodies. My concern is the taller grass interference with the MP "streams" if I use 04's. I've read/seen that the 1806's are a side entry which is said to be problematic for reasons I'm not sure (perhaps winter blowouts....SAM issues??? Does Rainbird make an 1806-SAM-PRS that is a "bottom feeder" like the 1804???

    Help settle the debate. What are the differences....and thanks for your input.
     
  2. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,029

    Side entry heads will not unscrew like a light bulb, if you need to replace a head. Until Rainbird makes a bottom-entry-only 1806, a lot of pros will leave the 1806 out of their installations.
     
  3. 1806s are fine. Side entry or no side entry they are better than all the rest. If you use sam/prs you MUST use the bottom entry. I would use 1806s in your case. Unless your pressure at the head is going to exceed 70psi I wouldn't worry about the prs on the MP rotators. They like pressure around 55 and a prs could take it as low as 30psi.
     
  4. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    We use mostly 4" spray pop-ups as bodies for our MP-Rotator installs but that's because we're presented with warm season, low mow grasses (Bermuda mixed with weeds) on our sites. [Our latest MPR renovation was put on 6" Hunter I-Sprays simply because I wanted to try them out.] However, in your area with cool season grasses that are higher mow I'd use the 6" bodies.
     
  5. The I sprays come with pressure reduction. How did you feel about the MPs performance? I put the MPs on 12" Hunter Is at the arboretum.
     
  6. Mike Leary

    Mike Leary LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 22,073

    I've used 12" in turf w/steep hilly conditions, work great.:)
    1806SAM/PRS IS a bottom load, the new ones come without side mount. Great head, my choice.
     
  7. Squirter

    Squirter LawnSite Member
    from Zone 5
    Posts: 172

    So, Fimco....are you saying Rainbird makes a bottom entry 1806...and that the only way to get a bottom entry 1806 is in a SAM/PRS????? If that's the case, looks like I'll be getting the PRS you indicate MAY not be necessary (unless pressures > 70psi.).

    As for the "issues" with the 1806 sam/prs, I guessing it has to do with the side entry making winter blow-outs difficult by leaving water to freeze thus cracking the head. I understand Wet Boots and his preference of the 1804 because of the ease of replacement (light bulb). However, I'm not sure what you base your statement on..."they are better than all the rest". Can you elaborate?
     
  8. PurpHaze

    PurpHaze LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 5,496

    Here's our latest renovation to MPRs on 6" Hunter I-Sprays. This area is on domestic supply that is "iffy" at times regarding pressure. They've worked great. I've also used them on high pressure areas and they performed great also.

    Green Acres Zone C-1 MPR Renovation 7-30-07 IV-01.jpg

    Green Acres Zone C-1 MPR Renovation 7-30-07 IV-02.jpg
     
  9. ALL 1806s have bottom entry. The check valve only works if you use bottom entry unless you use an external check valve in which case you don't need the additional cost of the sam.
     
  10. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,029

    Now, Toro makes bottom-entry-only popup bodies of 6 and 12 inch popup height.
     

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