Rainbird 5000 and 5000 Plus Rotors

Discussion in 'Irrigation' started by cenlo, Aug 27, 2006.

  1. cenlo

    cenlo LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ontario
    Posts: 322

    How many guys use these rotors...for how long...and how reliable? I'm thinking of switching from Hunter pgp
     
  2. why?:confused:
     
  3. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,017

    Rainbird keeps tinkering with their gear-drive rotors, and they still aren't as reliable as a PGP. I don't care how nice a Rain-Curtain nozzle's throw looks, if the head doesn't turn, what's the point?
     
  4. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,794

    I can't agree more, with the exception of nozzles 1,2, and 3, PGP nozzles aren't that bad, the grass gets watered, and the customer is happy.

    RainCurtain may look like its covering closer to the head better, but the truth is, the grass gets watered with PGP's regardless.
     
  5. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,017

    Even the littlest PGP nozzles can cover effectively, but ordinarily, those are going in corners or small areas, and the nozzle throw gets diffused with the adjusting screw anyway.

    I always thought that Hunter nozzles had good uniformity, even going back to early days, when the standard PGP had a fine-mesh strainer, and all the nozzles (even a #1) had a center distance hole and one or more close-in-coverage openings underneath, or to the side.

    To be sure, though, the smaller the nozzle, the less water flowing through the head, and the greater the likelihood of drive failure.
     
  6. cenlo

    cenlo LawnSite Senior Member
    from Ontario
    Posts: 322

    That's interesting because we use a lot of #3 nozzles. You think a #4 and #5 are that much better?
     
  7. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,794

    Since our water source varies so much, (Well's range between 5 gpm to 50 gpm, Non potable sources that range between 10 gpm and 100 gpm and meters that range from 10 gpm to 25 gpm), I don't have one set of nozzles I use on every job.

    Instead, I balance out the zones and do the math to nozzle appropriately for balanced precipitation.

    However, I think the #3 is a lot weaker looking than a #4, and I'll size my zones so that I can use larger nozzles (less heads per zone, less run time per zone) if at all possible.

    I typically only use #3's in 90 degree heads if I can get away with it.

    I know that some people (Hayes, and I think Bryan (BicMudPuppy)) nozzle all the heads the same, and keep different arced heads on different zones, and balance precipitation with the timer. I think this is needlessly overcomplicated.
     
  8. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,017

    In the good old days, you didn't get to change nozzles on heads (brass impact heads with 5/32" nozzles), so you either drowned the corners, or tried to lay out systems without 90 degree heads, and grouped the full-circles together.
     
  9. Dirty Water

    Dirty Water LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 6,794

    I understand those days boots, but we aren't in them anymore, so I still think breaking up zones into their arcs is oldschool and not needed anymore.
     
  10. Wet_Boots

    Wet_Boots LawnSite Fanatic
    Posts: 48,017

    I've done a few large systems with a 3-6-9 arrangement of PGPs on a square layout, but I could understand doing smaller systems with as few nozzle changes as possible (try changing the nozzle on a brass impact head [let alone finding alternate sizes] and folks will know how that practice came to be)

    Certainly, Hunter sells enough cases of PGPs with nozzles already installed.
     

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